FREE THEM; Iran Told to Give Up 15 Kidnapped Sailors They Claim Navy Was in Their Waters

The Mirror (London, England), March 24, 2007 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

FREE THEM; Iran Told to Give Up 15 Kidnapped Sailors They Claim Navy Was in Their Waters


Byline: By CHRIS HUGHES Security Correspondent

FOREIGN Secretary Margaret Beckett yesterday demanded that Iran hand over 15 sailors kidnapped at gunpoint.

She summoned Iranian ambassador Rasoul Movahedian to the Foreign Office in London to explain himself.

Mrs Beckett said she was "extremely disturbed" by events.

She added: "He was left in no doubt we want them back."

The eight Royal Navy sailors and seven Marines, in two patrol boats, boarded a merchant ship suspected of smuggling contraband and weapons in Iraqi waters in the Persian Gulf.

Vessels carrying Iranian Revolutionary Guard surrounded the personnel from frigate HMS Cornwall and took them hostage.

Shortly after their abduction at 10.30am local time yesterday, a helicopter pilot saw the two Royal Navy boats being escorted along the Shatt al-Arab waterway towards Iranian bases.

There were no signs of fighting and the sailors, believed to include one woman were taken away peacefully but "forcibly". HMS Cornwall's commander Commodore Nick Lambert said he hoped it was a misunderstanding over Iranian and Iraqi waters.

He said: "There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that they British personnel were in Iraqi territorial waters."

But he added: "The extent and definition of territorial waters in this part of the world is very complicated. We may find, and I hope we will, that this is a simple misunderstanding at a tactical level." Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's hardline government is under pressure from the United Nations over its nuclear programme and tension with the West is running high.

And Lieutenant Colonel Justin Maciejewski, commanding officer of British forces in Basra, claimed most of the violence against UK forces there is engineered by Iran.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

FREE THEM; Iran Told to Give Up 15 Kidnapped Sailors They Claim Navy Was in Their Waters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?