INDECENT; Maginness Slams Pounds 1.2m 'Bribe' to UDA Racketeers

The Mirror (London, England), March 24, 2007 | Go to article overview

INDECENT; Maginness Slams Pounds 1.2m 'Bribe' to UDA Racketeers


Byline: By ALAN ERWIN

POLICE revelations that a loyalist terror group still run extortion rackets yesterday heaped new pressure on Secretary of State Peter Hain to abandon a planned pounds 1.2million grant for their advisors.

SDLP Assembly Member Alban Maginness claimed it would be indecent of the Government to hand over public money to the Ulster Political Research Group (UPRG) in the wake of the latest security assessment.

He hit out after a senior detective disclosed the UDA, which is linked to the UPRG, was still muscling in on businesses and building sites.

He added: "Quite simply, this grant can't go ahead. This huge sum of money cannot be paid out to representatives of an organisation which has not decommissioned and is actively using its armed force to extort vast amounts of money.

"It cannot be paid to an organisation which confirmed on the very day the grant was announced that decommissioning is not even on its agenda.

"This direct rule bribe is indecent and it drags our whole political system into disrepute. It must be stopped immediately."

Uproar over the three-year conflict transformation funding plan announced by Social Development Minister David Hanson intensified after Det Supt Esmond Adair's disclosures. …

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INDECENT; Maginness Slams Pounds 1.2m 'Bribe' to UDA Racketeers
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