Deal out More Cash

The Mirror (London, England), March 24, 2007 | Go to article overview

Deal out More Cash


Byline: By DAN MCGINN

GORDON Brown needs to increase his stingy offer of cash for the Executive, DUP leader Ian Paisley insisted yesterday.

He told a business conference in Belfast the Chancellor's economic package would not produce the "step change" needed for a dynamic Northern Ireland economy.

And he accused the Chancellor of sleight of hand by announcing an additional pounds 1billion when pounds 400million of that money came from the Irish Government.

Mr Paisley urged the Federation of Small Businesses to support Ulster politicians in their bid to secure a better package.

He added: "Progress has been made in some areas but I do not believe there is anything in the present proposals which will close the gap with the rest of the UK.

"Additional money for roads or to allow some time for reconsideration of water charges is one thing.

"What is really needed are measures which will allow our economy to grow in future years and be less of an economic drag on the rest of the United Kingdom. …

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