Renee Green

By Decter, Joshua | Artforum International, September 1994 | Go to article overview

Renee Green


Decter, Joshua, Artforum International


PAT HEARN GALLERY

How is taste made and unmade? Renee Green addressed this question in her most recent project Taste Venue, 1994, by seeking to don multiple hats--cultural anthropologist, gallerist, social historian, esthetician, booking agent, curator, and cultural critic--in order to remind us once again that Eurocentric cultural values cannot claim universal validity. Green has long been preoccupie with exploring why the fundamental ethnic, racial, and ideological hybridity of our culture is still not widely acknowledged or understood, and with addressing how distinct, and occasionally antagonistic, cultural languages and experiences inform one another. In an effort to examine these issues in a new way, Green used this occasion to create conditions in which cultural intersections and interactions could become more than merely symbolic. She placed an advertisemen in the "party section" of The Village Voice classifieds offering the gallery as a rental space for entertainment-oriented events. Acting as a booking agent wit assistance from her musician brother Derrick (who appears with his band in a video shot by Green), she sought to induce people from different cultural arena to plug into the "hip"--now user-friendly--milieu of a gallery. The results of this experiment were rather telling: with the exception of a Sylvia Heisel fashion show and hip-hop clothing-line shoot, only members of the art community took immediate advantage of the relatively low rental fees to stage their own miniexhibitions. So much for crossover.

To a certain extent, the show functioned as a framing device for these events. In the gallery's front corridor, hung a series of Plexiglas signs, each offerin what the press release identified as "department headings"--i.e., hip phrases from current magazines ("special news," "buzz," "A-List," etc.). Further on, th main gallery room was filled with ephemera including a series of almost elegant black and white photographs of different places visited and/or lived in by the artist; a little metal shack (described as a time capsule) that contained various materials accumulated by Green; a reflective, iridescent disco-style sign that read "venue"; and strips of yellow tape inscribed with the phrase "space variable/variable space" framing sections of the otherwise blank gallery wall. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Renee Green
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.