Catholic Colleges, Universities Soak Up Pentagon Dollars

By Guntzel, Jeff Severns | National Catholic Reporter, March 9, 2007 | Go to article overview

Catholic Colleges, Universities Soak Up Pentagon Dollars


Guntzel, Jeff Severns, National Catholic Reporter


In 2002, an Association of American Universities report noted that nearly 350 colleges and universities were conducting research under funding by the Department of Defense, and that universities were receiving more than 60 percent of defense basic research funding.

"While we might intuitively accept the existence of a military-academic complex in America," wrote researcher Nick Turse, reviewing the association's report, "defining and understanding it has never been simple--both because of its ambiguous nature and its dual character. In actuality, the military-academic complex has two distinct arms. The first is the official, out-and-proud, but oft ignored, melding of the military and academia. Since 1802, when Thomas Jefferson signed legislation establishing the United States Military Academy, America has been formally melding higher education and the art of warfare. The second is the militarized civilian university--since World War II and the emergence of the national security state, civilian educational institutions have increasingly become engaged in the pursuit of enhanced war-making abilities."

Presenting a little more history, Turse reported: "In 1958, the Department of Defense spent an already impressive $91 million in support of 'academic research.' By 1964, the sum had reached $258 million and by 1970, in the midst of the Vietnam War, $266 million. By 2003, however, any of these numbers, or even their $615 million total, was dwarfed by the Pentagon's prime contract awards to just two schools, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Johns Hopkins University that, together, raked in a combined total of $842,437,294."

Following a trend in defense spending, those numbers just get bigger. And it's not just the major research universities like Stanford and MIT, who have long maintained complex connections to the Pentagon.

Catholic colleges and universities are soaking up their share of Pentagon research dollars. The number, placed next to the entirety of defense spending, or even placed next to the dollar amounts going to the country's top research universities, is small.

According to a Department of Defense document reporting all defense-related grants larger than $25,000 awarded to colleges and universities in fiscal year 2005, Catholic colleges and universities received nearly $23.5 million dollars in Pentagon funding.

Included on the list were schools that also have programs with a strong peace and justice focus such as the University of Notre Dame and Villanova University (both received roughly $1 million).

Also on the list were Catholic institutions as diverse as The Catholic University of America, DePaul University, Creighton University and Canisius College.

There is a perception, fed largely by dominant conspiracy theories, science fiction novels, and, in fairness, by the nature of many known programs (remember the death-dealing butterfly?) that the world of defense research money is a shady underworld.

In fact, the money channeled to colleges and universities by the Pentagon covers a wide range of projects.

A spokesperson for DePaul University noted that the school "did not receive any grant funds directly from the actual Department of Defense," though some funds were received "indirectly" from the department.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Catholic Colleges, Universities Soak Up Pentagon Dollars
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.