Fraser-Moleketi Vows to Fight Corruption in African Societies

Cape Times (South Africa), March 28, 2007 | Go to article overview

Fraser-Moleketi Vows to Fight Corruption in African Societies


BYLINE: Angela Quintal

PUBLIC Service Minister Geraldine Fraser-Moleketi yesterday announced a national campaign to fight corruption, including the promotion of whistle blowing as a “patriotic act”.

In a special statement to the National Assembly on the recently adopted Ekurhuleni Declaration, she said she would approach the business community in the next month to support a mass communication campaign along these lines.

The declaration followed a meeting earlier this month of 450 delegates to consider Africa’s challenge in confronting corruption.

“Africa will no longer be seen to be guided by the dictates of the industrialised countries, but will now stand up to lead the struggle against corruption. It is the poor who pay the highest price for corruption,” Fraser-Moleketi told MPs.

The national campaign was also aimed at making business aware of its legal requirements to report any attempts to engage in corrupt practices. It would also publicise the National anti-Corruption Hotline on 0800 701 701.

Fraser-Moleketi said the campaign would promote whistle blowing as a patriotic act to promote a corruption-free society.

Parliament is currently in a legal battle in the Labour Court with its former chief financial officer Harry Charlton and has rejected his argument that he was fired because he was a whistleblower in the Travelgate saga. Instead it accuses him of financial misconduct.

Fraser-Moleketi said that the Africa Forum on Fighting Corruption had agreed on a broader definition of corruption to include theft, fraud, bribery, extortion, nepotism, patronage and the laundering of illicit proceeds.

Moreover, the forum had also agreed that corruption occurred in both the public and private sphere and that organs of civil society were also susceptible to acts of corruption.

Fraser-Moleketi partly blamed Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index for the fact that corruption was largely seen as a vice affecting the public sector. …

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