A Career in Child's Play

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), March 29, 2007 | Go to article overview

A Career in Child's Play


Byline: Michelle Rushton

What does a career as a nanny involve?

Nannies work in private homes, caring for their employers' children. They are responsible for all aspects of childcare, and their duties vary depending on the number and ages of the children.

Babies and very young children need dressing, feeding, bathing and changing, whereas older children need to be taught basic social, reading and writing skills.

Nannies often take children on outings and keep them entertained through play.

Maternity nannies are employed to care for newborn babies.

Most nannies live with the family they work for, but there are opportunities for day-only positions.

What personal skills do you need?

You need to enjoy spending time with children, and have an interest in their development. You should also have a good imagination and be able to organise stimulating activities, while being responsible and aware of dangers.

Patience, tolerance and a sense of humour are a must, and you should be able to cope with unexpected situations, and stay calm under pressure. You need to be physically fit with plenty of energy and willing to work long hours.

What training do you need?

There are no qualifications required in order to work as a nanny. However, most employers and employment agencies prefer candidates with relevant childcare qualifications There are a number of full-and parttime courses that offer preparation for careers in nannying and often include a placement. Voluntary work with children is also a useful way to gain experience. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Career in Child's Play
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.