British Book Awards: Comedians Left Laughing and a Gong at Last for Grisham

Daily Mail (London), March 30, 2007 | Go to article overview

British Book Awards: Comedians Left Laughing and a Gong at Last for Grisham


THE great and the good of the literary world gathered at the Grosvenor House Hotel on Park Lane on Wednesday for the Galaxy British Book Awards.

Hosted by Richard Madeley and Judy Finnigan, the awards - occasionally referred to as 'the Oscars of the book industry' but more often called the Nibbies after the golden pen-nib the winners receive - celebrate those books that made the biggest impression during 2006.

It was a suitably starry event, with appearances from names such as Sophie Dahl, Cherie Blair, Brenda Blethyn and actor Kyle MacLachlan. For the second year, the award ceremony will be broadcast on television (on Channel 4, tonight at 8pm), so anyone who would like to remain in suspense about the winning titles may want to look away now.

It was a great night for British comedians, as both Peter Kay and Ricky Gervais took away awards. Kay's massive bestseller The Sound Of Laughter, picked up Biography of the Year, while Gervais, currently touring with his show Fame, was surprised live on stage in Ipswich with the news that Flanimals Of The Deep had been named Children's Book of the Year. The Dangerous Book For Boys, brothers Con and Hal Iggulden's compendium of fascinating facts for boys of all ages, was honoured as Book of the Year, while scientist Richard Dawkins was named Author of the Year after the huge success of The God Delusion, his controversial rebuttal of religion.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

British Book Awards: Comedians Left Laughing and a Gong at Last for Grisham
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.