Adjusting Limit Setting in Play Therapy with First-Generation Mexican-American Children

By Perez, Roxanna; Ramirez, Sylvia Z. et al. | Journal of Instructional Psychology, March 2007 | Go to article overview

Adjusting Limit Setting in Play Therapy with First-Generation Mexican-American Children


Perez, Roxanna, Ramirez, Sylvia Z., Kranz, Peter L., Journal of Instructional Psychology


This paper focuses on limit setting in play therapy with first-generation Mexican-American children in two important therapeutic environments that include the traditional indoor playroom and a proposed outdoor play area. The paper is based on a review of the literature and the authors' clinical experiences with this population. Although some similarities in limit setting between Mexican-American and non-Mexican-American children exist, there are a number of noteworthy differences that will be described and discussed in the paper.

**********

There is alack of literature regarding play therapy with culturally diverse populations (Drewes, 2005b). Information on play therapy tends to be focused on European-American values and perspectives (Coleman, Parmer, & Barker, 1993; Sue & Sue, 2003). Because children's play reflects their own cultural values and customs, it is especially important that play therapy techniques be in accordance with the values and traditions of culturally diverse children (Drewes, 2005a, 2005b; Hinman, 2003). In working with Mexican-American children, it is critical for therapists to be sensitive to the cultural nuances that can be part of their play (Garza & Bratton, 2005). It is inappropriate for therapists to impose their values and pre-conceived ideas on children (Sue & Sue, 2003). Due to cultural differences, monocultural play therapy techniques may not be suitable for all children. Different sets of therapeutic guidelines, procedures, and strategies may need to be used when working with culturally diverse groups to ensure that their involvement in play therapy is maximized.

Latinos comprise 13.4% of the population, are the largest ethnic minority group, and the fastest growing immigrant population in the United States (Hill, Bush, & Roosa, 2003; Rumbaut, 2005; Vazquez, 2004). This paper focuses on first-generation Mexican-Americans and is based on a review of the literature and experiences of the authors who work in the border region of south Texas. It is important to note, however, that therapists working with culturally diverse groups should be aware of within group differences (Hanson, 2004; Rodriguez & Olswang, 2003). For example, first-generation Mexican-American families may hold fast to most traditional Mexican values, but on the other hand, may adopt some mainstream European-American values and practices. Therapists are cautioned to be aware of the individual's values, beliefs, practices, acculturation level, socio-economic status, and immigration history to prevent over-generalization (Hanson, 2004).

Ginott's Limit Setting

While limit setting may be viewed as damaging to the establishment of therapeutic rapport, it is nonetheless critical for successful play therapy (Landreth, 2002). Without limits, the client would be allowed permissiveness of all actions, including aggression, hostility, violence, and destruction. Haim Ginott, who is considered one of the foremost play therapy theorists, provided the following rationale for the utilization of limits in play therapy (Ginott, 1961, pp. 103-105):

1. Limits direct catharsis into symbolic channels.

2. Limits enable the therapist to maintain attitudes of acceptance, empathy, and regard for the child throughout the therapy contacts.

3. Limits assure for the physical safety of the children and the therapist in the playroom.

4. Limits strengthen ego controls.

5. Some limits are set for reasons of law, ethics, and social acceptability.

6. Some limits are set because of budgetary considerations.

Ginott (1961) listed 54 limits to be considered by play therapists when working with children (see the Appendix). These limits are guidelines that have been utilized in effective child-centered play therapy (Landreth, 2002). Because Ginott did not address cultural diversity per se in his limit setting guidelines, it is recommended that they be re-examined to ascertain their applicability to diverse ethnic and cultural groups, including Mexican-Americans. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Adjusting Limit Setting in Play Therapy with First-Generation Mexican-American Children
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.