The Power of the Press; Journalists Mustn't Forget: What Goes around Comes Around

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 27, 2007 | Go to article overview

The Power of the Press; Journalists Mustn't Forget: What Goes around Comes Around


Byline: Deborah Simmons, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The National Association of Black Journalists is giving new meaning to the term "affirmative action." Immediately after the verbal assault on the Rutgers basketball team following the women's NCAA tourney, NABJ spoke out about the Don Imus affair, which became both the eye of a storm over political correctness and a new front in the culture war. If NABJ actually follows through with its ambitious plan to push the media toward taking a leading role to "really transform America" on the issue of race, then God bless us everyone.

The last time America had a national discussion on race was 1997, and it was at the behest of Bill Clinton. Prior to that was 1968 and the Kerner report, which concluded that there were two Americas: "one black, one white, separate and unequal."

Today, with (legal and illegal) Hispanic populations growing at a rate that surpasses black America's and white America's, the need for further dialoguing might end up proving that how our "communities" speak to and speak about one another just might be, to borrow a popular euphemism, in the mouth of the beholder.

We can't all just get along.

The year after the Clinton initiative, only one-third of us said that race relations had improved, according to a CNN/USA Today/Gallup Poll. Equally insightful was that 52 percent of us said relations are about the same, while only 34 percent of us weren't even paying attention to the Clinton race initiative.

It should go without saying that we aren't born of this world hating or even disliking other human beings. We usually reach a certain level of maturity and come to understand that some things - race, ancestry and nationality - are beyond our control.

Yet as Americans continue to mistakenly use quotas to battle imaginary discrimination, we must ask whether we, Americans, are helping or hurting ourselves.

Ignorance and lack of moral clarity can easily distract.

When people like Don Imus and Rush Limbaugh use racially offensive language, we are morally obligated to speak out.

When people like Rosie O'Donnell and Snoop Dogg grab their crotches and say something offensive, we are morally obligated to speak out.

We can't all get along, but we can all speak our minds like the civilized human beings we are.

That's exceptionally true for journalists. Individually and collectively we should speak truth to power.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Power of the Press; Journalists Mustn't Forget: What Goes around Comes Around
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.