Kazakhstan Plans Nuke Fuel Bank; Deal Will Be Signed with Russia

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 9, 2007 | Go to article overview

Kazakhstan Plans Nuke Fuel Bank; Deal Will Be Signed with Russia


Byline: David R. Sands, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Russia and Kazakhstan are poised to sign an agreement creating a joint uranium-enrichment center, a possible first step toward an international nuclear fuel "bank" that could remove the need for countries such as Iran to pursue their own enrichment programs, Kazakh Foreign Minister Marat Tazhin said yesterday.

Russian President Vladimir Putin is expected to sign an agreement to create the enrichment center in the Siberian city of Angarsk on a visit to Kazakhstan beginning today, Mr. Tazhin said in an interview with editors and reporters at The Washington Times.

Known for its huge oil and gas reserves, Kazakhstan is also the world's second-largest producer of uranium, and is expected to surpass market leader Australia in the next few years.

"Today it is just a bilateral arrangement, but it could be open to any country that wants to use the mechanism," Mr. Tazhin said.

He said the project was just getting under way and it would be up to Iran or any other nation to decide whether they want to participate.

"It is difficult right now to say who might want to join," he said.

Nonproliferation specialists have pushed the idea of a nuclear fuel bank as a way to discourage countries from developing their own domestic uranium-enrichment programs.

The Bush administration has led an international drive to block Iran's enrichment program, claiming it is secretly being used to produce fuel for nuclear weapons.

The U.S. Department of Energy last year initiated the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), a key part of which offered countries that renounced nuclear fuel-cycle activities access to U.S. nuclear fuel for civilian power needs.

At about the same time, Mr. Putin floated the idea of a network of international nuclear fuel-cycle centers, which Russian officials said could be used by developing countries seeking nuclear power.

The Angarsk site would be the first center in the network. Russian officials argue their plan could be implemented much more quickly than the American alternative.

A U.S. official familiar with the nuclear-bank debate said the Bush administration was "largely neutral" on the Russia-Kazakhstan plan. Both countries are members of the Nuclear Suppliers Group, which has strict standards designed to prevent nuclear weapons proliferation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Kazakhstan Plans Nuke Fuel Bank; Deal Will Be Signed with Russia
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.