Kilkenny All Business as University of Oregon's Athletics Leader

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), April 29, 2007 | Go to article overview

Kilkenny All Business as University of Oregon's Athletics Leader


Byline: Ron Bellamy The Register-Guard

Not a single personal photograph adorns the walls of Pat Kilkenny's office in the Casanova Center, and yet you get the sense that Oregon's new athletic director, each day, makes it more and more his place.

The athletic department, at least, if not the precise corner room where Bill Moos worked for 12 years.

In a short time - he was introduced as Oregon's new AD on Valentine's Day, signed his contract effective March 1 and moved into the office earlier this month after Moos' tenure ended officially March 31 - Kilkenny, with increasing confidence, has seized the reins of Oregon athletics.

He's reorganized the upper management of the athletic department; while he says it's "not totally" true that administrators had to apply for their old jobs, they underwent extensive interviews with Kilkenny and a consultant. Some have new roles, and former associate AD Jim Bartko has been rehired to oversee the project to construct a new basketball arena.

He's reached across the river, trying to bridge the "disconnect," perceived or not, between academics and athletics. He's attended meetings, been a presence on campus, made connections with UO student-athletes, and drawn on the athletes-oriented perspective and institutional history of former assistant football coach Neal Zoumboukos, now a special assistant to Kilkenny.

He's made it clear that it will be a priority of his administration to increase the financial base of the department and build reserves, which are virtually non-existent, while retaining the sense of innovation for which Oregon became famous - and infamous - during the Moos era. To those ends, he's hiring a full-time fundraiser, and will also soon advertise to hire a special assistant to focus on strategic planning.

And, with a sense of urgency - his contract expires in June 2009 - Kilkenny has literally brought the basketball arena project out of mothballs, determined to build something grand, if the donations support that vision, or something more modest, if that's what the finances dictate, but determined to build an arena, period, that will carry Oregon through the next 75 years.

His background is business - the former Oregon student who grew up in Heppner earned millions in the insurance industry in San Diego - and it's from the business world that Kilkenny draws inspiration and a sense of direction for the department. He distributed, within the athletic department, 250 copies of the book "Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... and Others Don't," by Jim Collins.

In May, he's bringing in dynamic management expert Tom Peters - "In Search of Excellence" - for an athletic department seminar.

He's made it clear to staff members, in writing, what they can expect from him: "Honesty. Consistency. A commitment to communication. Positive reinforcement and constructive criticism. Leadership through effective decision making and staff empowerment. Passion for the University of Oregon and the athletic department. A focus on what I believe is in the best interest of Oregon athletics."

And he told them what he expects from them: "Honesty. Teamwork. An open mind. Commitment. Professionalism."

He's been moved by what he's seen.

"This entire building is full of people who care," he said. "My prior life, people cared, but it was more about their bottom line, what's in it for them. ... Our coaches are just good people. Mike Bellotti, what a great guy he is; I've always had a lot of respect for him, but now I work around him, and he's a great team guy. He cares about everybody else.

"Ernie Kent goes around this building and writes notes and does all kinds of nice things for the rest of the people in this department. You wouldn't know that, unless you worked here."

Since Valentine's Day, Kilkenny said, he's spent three nights in San Diego, "and one was just to get some clothes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Kilkenny All Business as University of Oregon's Athletics Leader
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.