Putting a Face on History Woman's First-Person Portrayals Bring Great Ladies of the Past to Life

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 14, 2007 | Go to article overview

Putting a Face on History Woman's First-Person Portrayals Bring Great Ladies of the Past to Life


Byline: Susan Dibble

sdibble@@dailyherald.com

By day, Leslie Goddard can be found at the Elmhurst Historical Museum leading tours, teaching children and planning events as the community programs coordinator.

Evenings and weekends, the Des Plaines woman may take on the persona of Chicago socialite Bertha Palmer, Titanic survivor Violet Jessop or former first lady Abigail Adams in dramatic first-person presentations to social, civic and church organizations.

Goddard will debut her newest portrayal at 11:30 a.m. Sunday when she appears as pioneering nurse Clara Barton during Naper Settlement's Civil War Days activities.

Barton was such an important figure that settlement officials asked Goddard to develop the presentation, said Maureen Malloy, education event coordinator at the 19th-century living history museum near downtown Naperville.

No one in the area, it seems, regularly portrays Barton, who served as a nurse during the Civil War and founded the American Red Cross.

"We're really excited about her coming," Malloy said. "She's very well known for her Great Women in History series."

Goddard, who has done previous presentations at the settlement, said her research into Barton uncovered an amazing woman who isn't well-known to the public.

In her early 40s, when the Civil War started, Barton was working in the U.S. Patent Office and already had a successful career as a teacher. But she had not yet found a role that satisfied her ambition and desire to do something useful.

Learning of the troops' need for medical supplies and more timely care, she solicited donations, rented warehouses and entered battlefields with bullets flying about her.

"She was a one-woman powerhouse," Goddard said. "Not only did she survive this, she really kind of thrived on it."

But Barton - who carefully cultivated her image as the "angel of the battlefield" - is only the latest in Goddard's portrayals of women who went beyond the roles society expected of them.

"You can read about these characters. You can follow the details and facts. But it's very hard to get to what did it feel like, what was it like to be there.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Putting a Face on History Woman's First-Person Portrayals Bring Great Ladies of the Past to Life
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.