Dear Humans: Please Give Us Our Land Back; Activists: Development Consumes 20 Acres of Wildlife Habitat Each Hour

By Hunt, David | The Florida Times Union, May 20, 2007 | Go to article overview

Dear Humans: Please Give Us Our Land Back; Activists: Development Consumes 20 Acres of Wildlife Habitat Each Hour


Hunt, David, The Florida Times Union


Byline: DAVID HUNT

More homes mean less room to roam for Northeast Florida wildlife.

Despite efforts that have conserved more than 9 million acres of undeveloped land statewide, experts said species such as the Florida black bear have been cramped into smaller living spaces, leading to territorial disputes and inbreeding in the woods. Other animals leave the nest only to wander into neighborhood streets and rely on trash bins for food.

As the region grows, expect the property line between man and nature to shrink, a problem potentially dangerous to communities and the ecosystem alike.

"The land is losing its rural character," said Nick Atwood, a volunteer for the Animal Rights Foundation of Florida. "It's hard to imagine where they'll all go -- the animals and the people themselves."

Atwood's group contends development throughout the state consumes 20 acres of wildlife habitat each hour. A separate study, released in December by the Tallahassee-based environmental group 1000 Friends of Florida, projects the Northeast Florida population will jump from 1.5 million to 3.5 million over the next 50 years.

Depending on where you are in the state, wild pigs, raccoons, iguanas, bears and alligators can be common sights, Atwood said. In some cases, they've become targets for poachers and obstacles for motorists, he said.

The number of black bears killed on Florida's highways each year rose from two in 1976 to 127 in 2004, according to the state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The bulk of those deaths occurred in the Ocala area, records show.

State highway records show four people were killed and 316 were injured statewide in collisions with animals in 2005.

In the late 1990s, a $3 million project came together to funnel wildlife under U.S. 441 in the Paynes Prairie State Preserve in Alachua County, where record numbers of snakes, frogs and turtles were being flattened on a 2-mile stretch of highway.

Pete Southall, Northeast Florida's environmental administrator for the state Department of Transportation, said he sees such wildlife highway crossroads, called ecopassages, as a growing need statewide.

"Roads tend to fragment habitats," he said. "This allows animals to leave the habitat, reducing inbreeding."

PRESERVING MORE LAND

As a way to preserve wildlife land and control animal populations, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is considering taking over more than 25,000 acres between Clay, Duval and Nassau counties, a move that would allow hunting on the lands, said commission spokeswoman Karen Parker. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dear Humans: Please Give Us Our Land Back; Activists: Development Consumes 20 Acres of Wildlife Habitat Each Hour
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.