One in 10 Scots Are Now on a Learning Curve to Success; Our 43 Further Education Colleges Provide a Range of Courses Ideally Suited to the Needs and Abilities of People across the Country - and They Can Be a Springboard towards a New Career or Lifestyle

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), May 23, 2007 | Go to article overview

One in 10 Scots Are Now on a Learning Curve to Success; Our 43 Further Education Colleges Provide a Range of Courses Ideally Suited to the Needs and Abilities of People across the Country - and They Can Be a Springboard towards a New Career or Lifestyle


SCOTLAND'S further education colleges are constantly seeking to improve their courses and services for students.

With total funding now of more than pounds 500million, colleges are looking to extend the choice of courses on offer and attract more people into this vibrant learning sector.

Colleges are increasing their training for adults, school/college work and building new links with businesses.

And the quality levels remain extremely high - with one in 10 people currently undertaking Scottish college courses.

Scotland's 43 FE colleges provide first-class learning and training to people of all ages to develop knowledge and skills.

Some people want new skills and qualifications to help them at work, some want to go to university and gain a degree.

Others are studying for a change of career while some are happy enough to learn something just for the fun of it.

No longer do people have to worry about their age, where they live, family orwork commitments, or lack of previous qualifications.

A look through prospectuses from colleges quickly reveals a staggering choice of subjects and methods to study.

From catering to computing and 3Danimation, to hairdressing to horticulture and travel to tourism, there are many courses to suit.

Anyone can study full-time or part-time and you're not confined to the college that's closest to where you live either. That's because you have the option to learn at home, where you work or in an outreach centre, whatever is most suitable for you.

Colleges offer day release or evening classes and taster sessions - choose what is easier and most convenient for you.

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One in 10 Scots Are Now on a Learning Curve to Success; Our 43 Further Education Colleges Provide a Range of Courses Ideally Suited to the Needs and Abilities of People across the Country - and They Can Be a Springboard towards a New Career or Lifestyle
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