New Orleans Ready to Host Congress of Cities

By Becker, Christine | Nation's Cities Weekly, May 21, 2007 | Go to article overview

New Orleans Ready to Host Congress of Cities


Becker, Christine, Nation's Cities Weekly


The City of New Orleans is more than ready to host what could be one of the most interesting and exciting Congress of Cities ever.

That was one of the major conclusions from the work of a 25-member committee charged with shaping the 2007 Congress of Cities. The committee, chaired by Littleton, Colo., Mayor James Taylor, met last week in New Orleans. The conference will be held in New Orleans, November 13-17. It is the first time that the Congress of Cities will be held before the Thanksgiving holiday.

"The city is definitely ready for us," Taylor said. "And we have a great opportunity to give back to the citizens of New Orleans and learn from their experience surviving a major disaster and rebuilding a community."

The program framework for the conference will feature all the trademarks of a Congress of Cities--leadership training seminars, quality workshops on current issues facing city leaders, exciting general session speakers, networking opportunities and a strong connection with the host city and its surrounding region.

In addition, a series of mobile workshops, special conference sessions and community service opportunities will create a learning laboratory in New Orleans about how to prepare for, respond to and recover from a natural or manmade disaster. City officials say New Orleans is focusing its efforts today on "rebuilding community"--and they are anxious to share their lessons learned with colleagues from throughout the country.

Preliminary mobile workshop plans include the 17 post-Katrina recovery zones, pumping station operations, levee protection projects, mobile health clinics and public safety strategies. Mayor Ronnie Harris of nearby Gretna, La., has offered to host a mobile workshop demonstrating local community building efforts in his city.

Committee members also agreed to focus on the 2008 elections and what cities expect from new national leaders as part of the program--including inviting candidates for President to address the delegates.

"By coming to New Orleans, we'll not only witness and share in the rebirth of a great city," said Councilmember Bruce Tobey of Gloucester, Mass., "we'll also have a hand in shaping America's municipal agenda."

Committee members also participated in a tour of the French Quarter, the central downtown business district, the Ernest Morial Convention Center and areas hit hard by Hurricane Katrina. They were also encouraged to get out, walk around and experience the recovering city.

"My first visit to New Orleans was a very pleasant experience" said Mary "Dot" LaMarche, alderwoman from Farragut, Tenn. "I was very inspired by the resilient spirit of the people, the warm and generous hospitality, the delicious food, and the famous music. I felt very safe in the areas where I traveled.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New Orleans Ready to Host Congress of Cities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.