On to Summer

By Rosenfeld, Esther | Teacher Librarian, June 2007 | Go to article overview

On to Summer


Rosenfeld, Esther, Teacher Librarian


This issue marks the end of another school year, and the editors of Teacher Librarian hope you have found this year's issues to be informative, interesting, useful, and thought provoking. We thank our article contributors, our columnists, and our editorial board for maintaining the high quality of our publication. Special thanks go to Teri Lesesne and Holly Gunn. Terri is retiring after many years of writing the Author Portrait column, and Holly is retiring from writing the Searching the Web column. Thank you both for your special contributions to Teacher Librarian. Teacher Librarian continues to welcome your comments and suggestions on issues and themes for articles and regular columns. We also continue to invite your article submissions, with our author guidelines available at www.teacherlibrarian.com/about_us/write.html.

It has become a tradition that this June Notebook column contain some recommendations for professional and nonprofessional summer reading. This year, I can heartily recommend several such titles:

Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything, by Don Tapscott and Anthony Williams (2007). In this book, the authors assert that the collaborative aspects of Web 2.0, especially, wikis, are having a profound and revolutionary impact on how business is done and how organizations are run. Tapscott and Williams use a variety of examples, ranging from traditional resource extraction industries to the arts to a myriad of social networking online communities, to show how Web 2.0 tools are creating what they say is a new type of collaborative culture.

This I Believe: Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women, edited by Jay Allison and Dan Gediman (2006). This audiobook is based on a National Public Radio series of the same name, which was in turn a revival of a series created in the 1950s by Edward R. Marrow. It features 80 famous and not-so-famous contributors, such as Colin Powell, Isabel Allende, Gloria Steinem, and Bill Gates and, from the original 1950s series, Helen Keller Jackie Robinson, and Eleanor Roosevelt. …

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