Culture and Creativity Is Vital for a Thriving City; ANALYSIS A Lively, Diverse and Challenging Arts Scene Is Crucial to Any Thriving City, Writes Joanna Birch, Head of Corporate Relations at the University of Central England. However, Cultural Momentum Needs Commitment from Business

The Birmingham Post (England), June 5, 2007 | Go to article overview

Culture and Creativity Is Vital for a Thriving City; ANALYSIS A Lively, Diverse and Challenging Arts Scene Is Crucial to Any Thriving City, Writes Joanna Birch, Head of Corporate Relations at the University of Central England. However, Cultural Momentum Needs Commitment from Business


Byline: Joanna Birch

Birmingham's cultural credentials are often misunderstood or ignored, yet they offer the key to unlocking the true commercial potential of the city.

They demonstrate Birmingham's vibrancy and ability to offer a great lifestyle for both prospective employees and employers alike. They attract talent into the city and individuals who wish to associate themselves with that talent which in turn encourages business investment, student growth and potential income generation. In addition they reinforce Birmingham's status as a truly international city.

In a BBC Inside Out programme earlier this year, reporters undertook a review to pitch Birmingham and Manchester against one another as Britain's second city. The programme highlighted the worrying repercussions of not working together on a collective and united cultural vision. If 48 per cent of people in the UK believe Manchester to be the UK's second city, Birmingham needs to up its game to provide a strong cultural image to the world.

Our experience of the 80s and 90s show what a tremendous influx of publicity, tourism and new business can materialise from thinking big. However, the development of internationally recognised arts organisations, such as the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra and the Birmingham Royal Ballet, and opportunities such as the hosting of G8, do not happen without foresight, careful preparation - and passion.

And without greater vision, more involvement and greater commitment from the Birmingham business community, a city with world class arts and a thriving artistic community will be bypassed yet again in favour of competing cities.

However, Birmingham has real potential to knock back the competition. This year sees a range of high profile festivals including Fierce, New Art Birmingham and the second New Generation Arts Festival, organised by UCE Birmingham, all of which have successfully attracted national publicity.

There is great potential for Eastside (with Birmingham City Council's commitment to creating an education and cultural quarter there) to play a major role in supporting a strong infrastructure in which art can continue to flourish.

UCE Birmingham continues to be keen to support these developments with ambitious plans to invest in Eastside and strong endorsement by the new vice chancellor, David Tidmarsh.

The business community has a critical role to play in delivering this. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Culture and Creativity Is Vital for a Thriving City; ANALYSIS A Lively, Diverse and Challenging Arts Scene Is Crucial to Any Thriving City, Writes Joanna Birch, Head of Corporate Relations at the University of Central England. However, Cultural Momentum Needs Commitment from Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.