The Twenty-Fourth Annual ATWS Meeting

Journal of Third World Studies, Spring 2007 | Go to article overview

The Twenty-Fourth Annual ATWS Meeting


The Twenty-Fourth Annual Meeting of the Association of Third World Studies (ATWS), Inc., the largest organization of its kind in the world, founded at Georgia Southwestern State University in 1983 by Harold Isaacs, Ph.D., professor emeritus of history, was held at Winston-Salem State University, November 2-4. The conclave featured 33 panels and round tables which focused on the theme, "Transnational Challenges: Environment, Integration, and Security in the Third World."

The conference was sponsored by ATWS, Winston-Salem State University, Georgia Southwestern State University, and Mississippi State University.

The Keynote Banquet Address, "Imperial Globalization," was presented by Robert Fatton, Jr., Ph.D., Julia A. Cooper Professor at the University of Virginia. Michael Hall, Ph.D., associate professor of history at Armstrong Atlantic State University, gave the presidential address, "The Impact of the U.S. Peace Corp at Home and Abroad."

The prestigious ATWS "Presidential Award" for 2006 was presented to Shu-hui Wu, Ph.D., associate professor of history and a noted expert on Taiwanese history, who teaches at Mississippi State University, "In Recognition of Her Outstanding Contributions to the Promotion of Scholarship Devoted to the Third World."

Several awards were presented to recognize individuals who have made significant scholarly contributions to the academic discipline of Third World studies. The winner of the "Lawrence Dunbar Reddick Memorial Scholarship Award," for the best article published on Africa in the year 2005 issues of Journal of Third World Studies (JTWS), was Guy Martin, Ph.D.,who teaches political science at Winston-Salem State University. Professor Martin received this honor for his outstanding article, "The West, Natural Resources, and Population Control Policies in Africa in Historical Perspective," published in Volume 22, No. 1, Spring, 2005 issue of JTWS.

The winner of the "Cecil B. Currey ATWS Book Award," presented to the author of the best book published by a ATWS member during 2005-2006, was Hanchao Lu, Ph.D., professor of history at Georgia Institute of Technology, a world- renowned authority on Chinese history. Professor Lu won the award for his superlative study, "Street Criers: A Cultural History of Chinese Beggars," published by Stanford University Press in 2005.

The Toyin Falola ATWS Africa Book Award, given for the best book on Africa published in 2005-2006, was presented to Adam Ashforth, Ph. …

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