Regulatory Accountability Needed

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), June 6, 2007 | Go to article overview

Regulatory Accountability Needed


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Today, Rep. Henry Waxman will preside over a hearing on whether the Food and Drug Administration acted too slowly in responding to signals about the heart attack risks of taking a popular diabetes drug Avandia. Mr. Waxman already has the answer he wants: Indeed, well before the public knew, well before the New England Journal of Medicine ran the study claiming such a risk existed, the author, Dr. Steven Nissen. director of the Cleveland Clinic's cardiovascular center, had told Mr. Waxman of his findings. Before the article had surfaced in the press, Rep. Waxman had sent a letter to FDA Commissioner Andrew von Eschenbach informing him of the results and his intent to hold a hearing.

Dr. Nissen thus used his prominence and ties to Mr. Waxman and the media in order to engage in what one pundit has called drug safety vigilantism. So, while the media and Mr. Waxman have put Avandia, the FDA and drug companies on trial (once again) the real question is: Do we want Mr. Waxman and those he has anointed to usurp the authority of the FDA and scuttle proposed improvements to the current approach to regulation?

The Waxman-Nissen approach is clear: Come up with possible safety problems with questionable statistical approaches; share them with friendly members of Congress and editorialists who will use the findings to attack the FDA; hold hearings in order to put companies on the defensive and generate more lawsuits. …

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