NEA 1994 Visual Arts Organizations Grants

Afterimage, October 1994 | Go to article overview

NEA 1994 Visual Arts Organizations Grants


The Visual Arts Program of the National Endowment for the Arts recently announced grant recipients in its organizations and periodicals category for fiscal year 1994. This year is the second in which the periodicals were announced in the same category with visual arts organizations, and reviewed by the same 12-person peer panel. What follows in this issue is the second half of this list. The first half of the list appeared in the September 1994 issue.

Organizations may apply in this category if they have been created for artists and assure them an integral role in organizational policy development and programming, promote interaction and dialogue between artist and the public, and encourage and support contemporary art of high aesthetic quality.

The 1994 panel awarded grants totalling $1.9 million to 119 organizations and periodicals. Last year's VAO panel awarded $2 million to 143 organizations and periodicals. The following panel reveiwed this year's applications:

Tom Borrup (arts administrator and consultant, Minneapolis, MN); Robert Buitron (visual artist and freelance curator, Chicago, IL); Caroline Huber (arts administrator and curator, Houston, TX); Milena Kalinovska (museum director and curator, Boston, MA); Elaine King (museum director, curator, and art historian, Cinncinnati, OH); Arturo Lindsay (visual artist, educator and scholar, Atlanta, GA); Judy Moran (visual artist, arts administrator, and consultant, San Francisco, CA); Patsy Ong (Chinese interpreter and translator, New York, NY); Lari Pittman (visual artist, Los Angeles, CA); Ree Schonlau (arts administrator and curator, Omaha, NE); Pablo Schugurensky (visual artist and arts administrator, Olympia, WA); Reagan Upshaw (art critic, editor, and arts administarator, New York, NY).

In the following list the figure at the top right of each entry is the grant amount. At the end of each entry the abbreviation PYS indicates prior year support. The five amounts correspond to grant received from 1989 to 1993, respectively.

Longwood Arts Project, Bronx, NY $15,000

To support a series of visual arts exhibitions, related performances, and a year-end catalog. Exhibitions focus on the cultures, concerns, and aesthetic traditions of the communities of the South Bronx. Lectures, panel discussions, and publications accompany the exhibitions.

PYS: $7500; $12,500; $15,000; $17,500; $12,500.

Los Angeles Center for Photographic Studies, Los Angeles, CA $30,000

To support exhibitions, installations, lectures, and publications. Solo and group exhibitions feature emerging artists who work in experimental and traditional photographic forms. Produced on a thematic basis three times per year, Framework provides an alternative forum for the presentation of artists' projects.

PYS: $12,500; $15,000; $15,000; $20,000; $30,000.

Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, Los Angeles, CA $32,500

To support exhibitions, performances, video art screenings, public art projects, services, publications, and an artists' bookstore. LACE presents experimental visual art in all media, showcasing new work by emerging and established artists of local, regional, and national significance.

PYS: $42,500; $45,000; $35,000; $35,000; $32,500.

Manchester Craftsmen's Guild, Pittsburgh, PA $12,000

To support exhibitions and facilities for artists working in ceramics and photography. Exhibitions feature emerging and nationally recognized artists and are accompanied by interactive workshops and lectures.

PYS: none; none; none; $5000; $6000.

Maryland Art Place, Baltimore, MD $16,000

To support a series of exhibitions, installations, public programs, and services. Exhibitions feature the work of visual artists at different stages of their careers working in all media. Services include a slide registry and resource center, studio visits, and a quarterly newsletter.

PYS: $20,000; $10,000; $7500; $10,000; $12,500.

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