WOMEN'S HEALTH; Breast Cancer Strides

The Florida Times Union, June 7, 2007 | Go to article overview

WOMEN'S HEALTH; Breast Cancer Strides


Every year, breast cancer becomes a harsh reality for thousands of women and their families.

Sadly, many die because it was not diagnosed and treated early enough.

One reason is lack of access to health care among minorities, the poor and those without insurance.

Susan G. Komen for the Cure hopes to remedy this disparity by investing $10 million in the next four years to improve cancer care in the United States.

To achieve this, it will partner with the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Programs and grants will allow more access to care and better delivery of it, the nonprofit organization says in a recent press release.

This couldn't come at a better time, as the shrinking middle class suffers from many of the same health insurance struggles as low-income people.

This will certainly also help the health care system to handle the influx of baby boomers and increasing number of cancer survivors, as the release points out.

And there's more good news.

One of four diagnosis and treatment studies announced at the society's annual meeting shows fewer, larger radiation doses following surgery are effective in reducing the risk of recurrence without increasing side effects. …

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WOMEN'S HEALTH; Breast Cancer Strides
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