'BLACK PEOPLE SHOULD JUST EAT CHICKEN & RICE' EXCLUSIVE BIG BROTHER 8: PALS REVEAL RACIST HISTORY Emily Sick Joke to Girl She Abused at College

The People (London, England), June 10, 2007 | Go to article overview

'BLACK PEOPLE SHOULD JUST EAT CHICKEN & RICE' EXCLUSIVE BIG BROTHER 8: PALS REVEAL RACIST HISTORY Emily Sick Joke to Girl She Abused at College


Byline: By WILL PAYNE and TOM CARLIN

EVICTED Big Brother housemate Emily Parr really IS an ignorant racist, her ex-classmates and pals have revealed.

Posh Emily, 19, who claimed she was only joking when she called fellow housemate Charley Uchea a n*****, has a history of racial taunts dressed up as "jokes".

Former drama college classmates and friends told The People how the middle-class blonde...

LAUGHED about black people eating chicken and rice with hot sauce.

CALLED a mixed-race teenager "Charcoal Girl".

PUSHED in front of a black girl at college and snarled: "Whites first, bitch."

TOLD black students they should work in fried chicken takeaways.

CONSTANTLY used the n***** word.

Ex-classmate Gloria Assibey, 20, said: "Emily used the word plenty of times. She is not unintelligent but she chooses to be ignorant. I had to stop talking to her because she kept saying n***** and kept offending me.

"When I heard about the racist comment on the show it didn't surprise me.

"The thing that is really annoying is that she thinks she can make these hurtful comments and then get away with it by saying it is a joke.

"She has obviously learnt that tactic from a young age. But you can't hide the person you are. Now everyone knows what she is really like."

Gloria quickly learned what Emily was like at the South West Academy of Dramatic Arts in Bristol last year.

Gloria said: "I was in the canteen and she pushed in front of me and said, 'Whites first, bitch' and started laughing.

"Once in class we had to pick music to act to and we picked some rap music she said 'That is typical of you to pick that, black people listen to black music'. That really annoyed me.

"She said n***** plenty of times. She asked why some black people called others n*****. I said that's their problem but it doesn't mean that you can call me that.

"The fact is she didn't even know me but still had the nerve to say it to me.

"She doesn't realise how racist she is. She just says I'm not racist but I think this. She upset a lot of us. …

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