Monica Bonvicini: West of Rome, Inc

By Holte, Michael Ned | Artforum International, November 2006 | Go to article overview

Monica Bonvicini: West of Rome, Inc


Holte, Michael Ned, Artforum International


Monica Bonvicini's recent exhibition in a vacated 18,000-square-foot Organized Living store on the second floor of a Pasadena shopping mall allowed the artist to push her ongoing interrogation of architectural space--specifically, the way in which constructed space defines, and is defined by, sexual politics--to its contextual limit. Featuring more than thirty sculptures, videos, drawings, collages, and installations dating from 1998 to the present, the show also served as a de facto midcareer survey.

Bonvicini's ambitious confrontation with the viewer began well before one entered the store: A group of framed drawings occupied the display windows while two site-specific sculptures were placed on the sizable exterior balcony. On the building's parapet, the artist installed an elegant scaffolding of stainless steel that supported large matching steel letters spelling out the word DESIRE. These were readily legible from the street and introduced one of the show's recurring themes.

Visitors entered the sprawling exhibition by prying open the once-automated entrance doors, and there they immediately encountered Plastered, 1998, a floor-bound grid of off-the-shelf drywall sheets laid atop a spongy Styrofoam substrate. Frequently crushed in the corners where the panels abutted, the work literally undergirded the entire exhibition while heightening the viewer's awareness of his or her own body. Adding to the uneasy atmosphere was a looping, noirish sound collage of walking bass, harpsichord, and a cymbal crash. This serves as the sound track for a two-channel video installation, Destroy She Said, 1998, which borrows its name from a novel by Marguerite Duras and takes its dueling images of sublime leading ladies--Monica Vitti, Anna Karina, Shelley Winters--from a selection of film classics. Bonvicini utilized the drywall panels, mounted on floor-to-ceiling frames of two-by-fours, as screens for the projected video, self-consciously scattering a mess of leftover lumber, hardware, and sawdust on the floor. …

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