Luca Trevisani: Pinksummer

By Pioselli, Alessandra | Artforum International, November 2006 | Go to article overview

Luca Trevisani: Pinksummer


Pioselli, Alessandra, Artforum International


According to Epicurus, the essence of things resides in atoms, which, infinite in number, move in infinite space. Their eternal movement is not a simple dispersion, but rather a fall, subject to a slight swerve, or clinamen. It is this eventual deviation from the straight line that allows them to accumulate. "Clinamen" is the title of Luca Trevisani's exhibition, which comprises five pieces from 2006, including a video of the same name. Shot on a skateboard ramp, it shows a series of ice spheres that roll down, bump against each other, break apart, and melt as they follow the ramp's path. Trevisani seems to choose shots that transform the space into a pure intersection of rationalist lines, but with the ambiguity of a de Chirico--esque metaphysical piazza.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Accumulation and proliferation are two recurring concepts in Trevisani's work--metaphors for thought processes that proceed according to an impenetrable and nonlinear logic, in continuous development and transformation. In the interview printed in the gallery press release, the artist states that he is interested in the liberation of energy: in the expansion of material and in the passage from one physical state to another--ice, water; solid, geometric form and unstable liquid; in light and in time. Gibbosa e sfuggente (Lumpy and Elusive) is a pair of nylon spheres, velvety to the touch, which illustrate the phases of the moon. Partirei dall'acqua (I Would Start Out From the Water) is a sphere made of resin. The transparent material captures the light, and inside the sphere is an hourglass.

Trevisani's thought finds expression in his precise formal research and in the warmth of the sensitive, soft material. …

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