Margarete Jakschik: Galerie Gisela Capitain

By Smolik, Noemi | Artforum International, November 2006 | Go to article overview

Margarete Jakschik: Galerie Gisela Capitain


Smolik, Noemi, Artforum International


The thirty-five framed photographs in this debut solo exhibition were small and pale, with subjects that don't reveal anything spectacular--and yet the works of Margarete Jakschik, a Polish-born artist who has lived in Germany since 1980, when she was six years old, fascinate at first sight. Jakschik completed her studies at the Kunstakademie in Dusseldorf two years ago under the tutelage of Thomas Ruff, but little connection is made here to his artistic process. Indeed, Jakschik's photographs are rather the opposite of Ruff's: subjective, intimate, contingent, passionatee--even romantic.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

For years Jakschik has been fascinated by the Los Angeles music scene of the '60s and '70s. "Pardon My Heart," the title of a 1975 song by Neil Young, is accordingly the title of her exhibition, in which individual photographs go untitled (all works 2006). Drawn by desire and mourning for something irretrievably vanished, she wandered the city and its environs for two months. The images yielded by these excursions are unusual. We have never seen Los Angeles this way before. No gleaming sky, no swimming pools, none of the transparency of an Ed Ruscha painting, no glossy surfaces, no fast living. Instead, calm, cautious searches, glances that only fleetingly graze what is seen instead of pretending to capture it for eternity like the billboards that inspired Ruscha. The images seem to have come about by accident, and yet they tell the story of an era of dissolution--and they tell it with great precision. It is the small details, those that don't immediately attract the eye, from which the stories are built. …

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