Entertainment Advisory: Book, Movie, and Television Reviews and News on the Web

By McDermott, Irene E. | Searcher, July-August 2007 | Go to article overview

Entertainment Advisory: Book, Movie, and Television Reviews and News on the Web


McDermott, Irene E., Searcher


As media morphs and proliferates in our technological age, it becomes increasingly difficult for us to decide what we actually want to spend our leisure time watching or reading. What's worse, anyone with an Internet connection can express an opinion about leisure-time offerings on blogs or other social networking sites. It's getting to the point that we need reviews of reviewers to find resources that suit our temperament and give us quality information about what to read or see.

These various resources can help us and our patrons choose entertainment wisely.

Media Portals

These sites offer a broad overview of entertainment options in a variety of media.

Entertainment Weekly

http://www.ew.com/ew

The Web counterpart to the magazine covers aspects of many traditional media: books, theater, movies, video games, and music. It offers print and video reviews, behind-the-scene news, and interviews with the "talent." If you feel out of touch with popular culture, this is a great place to get yourself up-to-speed!

Zap2It

http://www.zap2it.com

Here's a portal for those who love both movies and TV. Read blogs here that cover the news about television series: their shuffling schedules and even plotlines. Critic Picks features movie reviews from the members of the exclusive National Society of Film Critics. See their rankings of the latest releases, and browse a collection of their thoughts. Find movie showtimes and TV listings, too

JAM

http://jam.canoe.ca

Canadians, get an overview of show business from a Canuck perspective.

Books

Librarians know how to get the skinny on new books: We have to buy them--with other people's money! We check Library Journal [http://www.libraryjournal.com] and Publisher's Weekly [http://www.publishersweekly.com], The New York Times Book Review [http://www.nytimes.com/pages/books] (free with registration), and Booklist (corresponding print subscription required), among others. We will even read Amazon. com for its concise aggregations from major review sources and even some of the "real people" reviews. Still, the more thorough among us may dig even further online.

Overbooked.org

http://www.overbooked.org

Ann Chambers Theis, collection management administrator at the Chesterfield County Public Library in Virginia, maintains this fiction selection and review directory as a labor of love. Browse her links to information about new and notable general and genre fiction.

BookWeb: Book Sense Picks

http://www.bookweb.org/booksense/seventysix/6977.html

The American Booksellers Association, the professional group representing all your quality independent bookstores, assembles monthly picks and reviews of its favorite releases. Here are links to its lists for the last year and a half.

The New York Review of Books

http://www.nybooks.com

The current magazine appears here with its novella-length intellectual articles and reviews. The NYRB mostly covers nonfiction, as befits its air of gravitas. Still, the site does offer reading group guides for recent literary fiction: http://www.nybooks.com/nyrb/rgg.

London Review of Books Online

http://www.lrb.co.uk

Say, the entire current issue is right here, with its interesting, if lengthy, articles. Subscribers to the print publication can register to find archives back to 1998.

ReadingGroupGuides.com

http://www.readinggroupguides.com/findaguide/index.asp

This site very handily compiles reading group guides originally put online by the books' publishers. Browse by title or author, or view books by subject category ("Books into Movies," "Mystery & Thriller," "Men's Interest," etc.).

The Beat Books

http://www.kuow.org/programs/thebeat_books.asp

Public radio station KUOW in Seattle hosts podcasts of book reviews by librarian Nancy Pearl. …

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