WEDNESDAY'S LETTERS: Steroids and Sportswriters, Bob Woodward

By , E&P | Editor & Publisher, October 4, 2006 | Go to article overview

WEDNESDAY'S LETTERS: Steroids and Sportswriters, Bob Woodward


, E&P, Editor & Publisher


In today's letters, readers weigh in on Joe Strupp's exclusive feature about sportswriters and the steroids scandal, and others think Bob Woodward's new book is insufficient repentence for his past coverage of the Bush White House.

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Sportswriters and Steroids

Okay. Maybe it's because I'm a BoSox fan and therefore accustomed to sporting abuses -- and not that it isn't an important issue for role-models -- but I just don't get this preoccupation with the steroids thing. Compared with the war in Iraq, the evaporation of pension and health care benefits, and protecting schools from shooters, I am at a loss to explain why Congress is involved with overpaid bat jockeys who are determined to game the system no matter what. Wait -- maybe I answered my own question. But what are our priorities, exactly? Let the baseball leagues marshal the steroids, the bad brew, the lack of adequate restroom facilities for women, then maybe Congress will have time for important things. Like ethics investigations. Go Boston! Marty GoldenMaine

Of course [sportswriters] blew it [on the steroids scandal]! And in the past they blew issues with alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, infidelity, and promiscuity. But then again, boys will be boys. As an Army public affairs officer who embedded nearly 100 members of the press and broadcast media in my unit during OIF, I was amused at the accusations that the media would become "in-bedded" with the soldiers and not report candidly. In my opinion, there was more honest reporting in three weeks of the initial ground war than there has been in decades of sports reporting or other beat reporting such as law enforcement or government officials at any level. Reporters have long given up their objectivity for access in these "beats". Michael BirminghamLt. Col., U.S. Army

***

Bob Woodward's Book

Not that I would want to defend Bob Woodward -- whose fall from journalistic grace needs no reminders -- but I do hope his new book and your continued editorial focus will inspire our sleeping media to chase all these so-called leaders out into the light. …

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WEDNESDAY'S LETTERS: Steroids and Sportswriters, Bob Woodward
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