Criminal Law and Criminology: A Survey of Recent Books

By Casper, Juliet M. | Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Fall 1994 | Go to article overview

Criminal Law and Criminology: A Survey of Recent Books


Casper, Juliet M., Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology


COMMUNITY POLICING--UNITED STATES

Bureau of Justice Assistance, Neighborhood-Oriented Policing in Rural Communities: A Program Planning Guide (Washington, D.C.: The Bureau, 1994) 117 pp.

A neighborhood-oriented policing program is one way to achieve greater effectiveness in the handling of certain crimes. This book is a step by step guide to developing, implementing, and assessing a rural community policing program. Under such a plan, citizens share in the responsibility for dealing with crime, while police work is reoriented to reflect a more proactive and problem-solving approach to crime. The appendixes provide sample surveys, a mission statement with goals, problem-solving guides, and sources for further information.

The challenge of Community Policing: Testing the Promises (Dennis P. Rosenbaum, ed.) (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1994) 320 pp.

Traditional policing methods, such as random squad car patrols and radio call responses, have failed to permanently impact the problem of violent crime, drug trafficking, and gang activity in many American cities. The press and politicians have heralded community policing as the best alternative. Going beyond the rhetoric and politics, this book contains

Juliet M. Casper(*) Reference Librarian, Northwestern University School of Law Library. B.A. 1989, Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame; J.D. 1992, Indiana University-Bloomington; M.L.S. 1993, Indiana University-Bloomington. articles that attempt to define the terminology, describe different types of programs, and evaluate the community policing programs that a number of cities in the United States and Canada have implemented. The articles address the implementation problems, the attitudes of the law enforcement agents, and the impact on the community.

CORRECTIONS-UNITED STATES

Escaping Prison Myths: SelecteD Essays in the History of Federal Corrections (John W. Roberts, ed.) (Washington, D.C.: American University Press, 1994) 212 pp.

A one-day conference was held on 28 March 1991, at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., to commemorate the centenary of federal imprisonment. This book acts as a record of the proceedings at that conference--a conference dedicated to the history of federal corrections. Federal imprisonment began with the Three Prisons Act of 1891, which authorized the building of federal prisons at Leavenworth, Kansas; Atlanta, Georgia; and MacNeil Island, Washington. The authors trace the evolution and influence of the federal prison system with a particular attention to the prisoner classification system, inmate rights, prison programs, and management styles and techniques.

CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR--UNITED STATES

Thomas Gabor, "Everybody Does It!": Crime by the Public (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1994) 378 pp.

Professor Gabor explores the prevalence of criminality in the United States and Canada and refutes the commonly-held notion that criminals constitute a marginal group of wicked individuals. Incentives, personal stresses, provocations, peer pressure, and other social forces may lead a law-abiding citizen to deviate from the norm. Gabor analogizes crime to the common cold--no one is completely immune from it, and not everyone is equally susceptible to it. The seriousness of the crime and the frequency and persistence of such criminal behavior is what differs from person to person.

J. Robert Lilly, et al., Criminological Theory. Context and Consequences (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2nd ed., 1994) 256 pp.

The authors have thoroughly revised four chapters of this work for this edition. Also, a new chapter addresses the feminist perspective and "left realism." The authors continue to focus on the interconnections between social context, criminal theory, and criminal justice policy-making in this primer on criminological theory.

CRIMINAL LAW--UNITED STATES--PHILOSOPHY

Justification and Excuse in the Criminal Law: A Collection of Essays (Michael Louis Corrado, ed.

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