Have Business Communication Instructors Changed Their Perception of Business Ethics? A Comparative Study

By English, Donald; Manton, Edgar et al. | Journal of Organizational Culture, Communications and Conflict, January 2006 | Go to article overview

Have Business Communication Instructors Changed Their Perception of Business Ethics? A Comparative Study


English, Donald, Manton, Edgar, Walker, Janet, Journal of Organizational Culture, Communications and Conflict


ABSTRACT

The major purpose of this study was to determine if business communication instructors in the Southeastern and Southwestern Regions of the Association for Business Communication changed their perceptions of the teaching of business ethics between 1999 and 2004. This study analyzed and compared the current views of business communication instructors with those in the 1999 study. For example, in 1999, 83 percent of the respondents indicated that they taught business ethics topics in their courses. In the 2004 study, this percentage increased to 92 percent.

INTRODUCTION

Interest in business ethics has grown significantly over the last few years. Most organizations still focus on maximizing profits for investors but many also emphasize appropriate and conscientious operational conduct and its effects on employees, investors, customers, and the entire business community. However, as evidenced by recent events, not all companies follow ethical tenets. Furthermore, in some cases, what a company publicly espouses may be vastly different from what is actually practiced.

Business ethics is currently one of the most important topics in business education instruction. "The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of business" (AACSB) has studied this issue and is considering how it should be incorporated into the business curriculum. It is increasingly clear that current and future business graduates need information about acceptable business practices in order to perform effectively in ethical business environments.

PROBLEM

The problem of this study is to determine if business communication instructors in the Southeastern and Southwestern Regions of the Association for Business Communication have changed their perception of business ethics during the past five years. A questionnaire has been developed and mailed to the business communication instructors in these regions. A similar questionnaire was sent to the same response group in 1999. A comparison of the responses will be made. In light of recent business scandals, it is hypothesized the business communication instructors will be more concerned about ethics instruction now than they were in the past.

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

The objectives of this study are to compare the results of the 1999 study with those from the 2004 study. Comparisons will be made for the two years:

1. to determine if business ethics topics were included in the curriculum

2. to determine the class hours spent on business ethics

3. to determine the perceived value of business ethics

4. to determine how respondents rated undergraduate instruction in business ethics

5. to determine if the emphasis on business ethics has changed

6 to determine the business ethics topics taught

7 to determine the value of various teaching methods/materials.

8 to determine how the instructors received their education in ethics.

RELATED LITERATURE

Since 2001, business educators have become familiar with Enron, Arthur Andersen, WorldCom, Tyco, and others. How has this affected instructor thinking on ethics and teaching an ethics course in colleges of business?

According to David Callahan, author of The Cheating Culture, we seem to be becoming a nation of cheaters. He says, "Executives and workers steal $600 billion from their companies each year compared to the federal deficit total of $560 billion". He blames the "dog eat dog economic climate of the past two decades" and pushes for cultural change (Callahan 2004).

AACSB emphasized in their revised 'Eligibility Procedures and Standards for Business Accreditation' the importance of ethics instruction. One of the standards included is Ethical understanding and reasoning abilities (AACSB, 2004).

In a speech, "Will Our Moral Compass Fail", given to the Athens West Rotary Club, Athens, Georgia in April 2003, Dr. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Have Business Communication Instructors Changed Their Perception of Business Ethics? A Comparative Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.