An Investigation of Taiwanese Early Adolescents' Self-Evaluations concerning the Big 6 Information Problem-Solving Approach

By Chang, Chiung-Sui | Adolescence, Summer 2007 | Go to article overview

An Investigation of Taiwanese Early Adolescents' Self-Evaluations concerning the Big 6 Information Problem-Solving Approach


Chang, Chiung-Sui, Adolescence


INTRODUCTION

In an information society, all people should have the right to information which meets a wide range of personal needs (American Library Association ALA, 1989). People must be information literate, and to do so, a person must be able to recognize when information is needed and know how to locate, evaluate, and use it effectively (ALA, 1989). Further, Doyle (1994) and Moore (1995) stated that an information literate person combines the following qualities and abilities: formulates questions based on the need; identifies potential and appropriate sources of information; develops successful search strategies; evaluates information, and uses critical thinking in problem solving. Thus, problem-solving skill has now become paramount and is recognized as basic in today's information society. The new education must teach the individual how to classify and reclassify information, and how to evaluate its accuracy. Also, problem solving requires high-level reasoning skills (Gick, 1986). Thus, today we need to model instructional supports for students (Johanssen, 1997). As literature suggests, students' cognitive strategies, such as information processing skills, determine successful information acquisition from the WWW (Hill & Hannafin, 1997; Hill, 1999). Lin (2001) also suggested that teachers develop instructional methods to help students gain metacognitive skills in organizing, monitoring, evaluating, and regulating their thinking processes. There is no doubt that "Big 6 skills" is one of the information problem-solving approaches for adolescent students. This approach, developed by Eisenberg and Berkowitz (1999a, 1999b), is an information literacy curriculum, an information problem-solving process, and a set of skills which provide a strategy for effectively meeting information needs. It can be used whenever students are in a situation, academic or personal, which requires information to solve a problem, make a decision or complete a task (Big 6, 2002).

The Big 6 approach to the information-solving process defines the task (step one), sets strategies for seeking information (step two), locates and accesses the information itself (step three), extracts relevant information (step four), presents the results (step five), and seeks reaction to the work done (step six). This framework is in part similar to Hill's (1999) conceptual view for understanding information searching in an open-ended information system.

Although some researchers have tried to explore students' views of the computer attitude (e.g., Tsai, Lin, & Tsai, 2001; Tsai, 2004) or their computer literacy in the past decade, this study tried to develop a questionnaire to help understand early adolescents' (fifth and sixth graders) information problem-solving skills. Research also reveals that early adolescents lack competence to develop their own information-searching skills and judge their problem-solving process (e.g., Tsai & Tsai, 2003; Chang & Weng, 2005). In administering the questionnaire, grade, gender, and library-use experience differences were analyzed. Further, since the sample included different school districts (urban/ rural), a comparison of these students was undertaken.

METHOD

Sample

The initial sample of this study consisted of 1,550 Taiwanese early adolescent fifth and sixth graders. Participants were selected from three major demographic areas--Northern, Central, and Southern Taiwan. This may not be considered a national sample, but those selected were from divergent academic and demographic areas, and belonged to various socioeconomic backgrounds. Students' nonresponses, unintentional omissions or unidentifiable marks on some items of the survey, were processed as "missing data." After excluding them, 1,539 valid questionnaires were available for statistical analysis--796 boys (51.4%) and 743 girls (48.1%); 772 were sixth graders, and 762 were fifth graders, 58% were from urban and 42% were from rural school districts. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

An Investigation of Taiwanese Early Adolescents' Self-Evaluations concerning the Big 6 Information Problem-Solving Approach
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.