This Airport Protest Flies in the Face of Logic; the Writing Is on the Wall: Camp for Climate Action Protesters Take Part in 24 Hours of "Direct Action" against Heathrow Operator BAA

The Evening Standard (London, England), August 20, 2007 | Go to article overview

This Airport Protest Flies in the Face of Logic; the Writing Is on the Wall: Camp for Climate Action Protesters Take Part in 24 Hours of "Direct Action" against Heathrow Operator BAA


Byline: NEIL COLLINS

AT THE weekend I found myself at the Eastbourne Airshow - a homage toair travel at the very time Heathrow protesters are complaining about it. Itwas overwhelming: thousands of cheerful souls sitting on the shingle to seeplanes showing off, burning the earth's resources for sheer entertainment.

There were stunt planes, Spitfires and jet fighters galore: but the highlight,on Saturday afternoon, was the arrival of the biggest bird in the show; as aBoeing 747 lumbered round Beachy Head at Dambusters' height, thousands ofpeople leapt from their deckchairs for a better view.

This plane, which everyone there had seen every time they went to an airport,eclipsed everything else. The response to the spectacle would have broken thehearts of the much smaller numbers who also spent their weekend watching planesat our main airport in the protest about our addiction to air travel thatreached its climax today.

Despite the attempts to paint them as the usual rent-a-mob of weirdos,troublemakers and general misfits, most are measured and sincere (the 14arrested last night after clashes with police excluded) and the vast majorityhave shown considerable forbearance in the face of attempts by the police totreat them as potential terrorists. There's no point in denying that theprotesters strike a chord with millions who wouldn't dream of joining them.

We're deeply uneasy about the possibilities of climate change, and we don'tlike the prospect of yet more of the remaining green bits of the South- Eastgetting a concrete coating in the development of another Heathrow terminal.

Can't we sacrifice a little of the potential economic growth in return forstopping further development and doing our bit to save the planet? It's abeguiling thought, but it is highly dangerous. Our prosperity is built on ourability as a trading nation, and globalisation has made trading much morecompetitive.

It's no longer good enough to be the most efficient maker of widgets in thecountry when there's a more efficient producer in China. As with goods, so withservices. It's no longer enough to be the best bank in Frankfurt, because thefinancial innovators in London can offer your customers better solutions totheir problems.

Even the most blinkered protester will have seen the benefits that globalfinancial services have brought to Britain. The City of London is not only amassive generator of jobs, it's also scooping up a growing share of the worldmarket in finance. Globalisation means the winner takes all, and financialservices is this country's only world-class industry that has any scale.

The crowds on the other side of the fence from the Heathrow camp, seeking toescape a miserable summer weatherwise, are a reflection of the prosperity thateconomic progress has brought, and their miserable journey through the airportis a consequence of the failure to build enough capacity to meet the demand forflights.

Their motto might not quite be "sod it, let's fly", but they've earned themoney and have the right to spend it in any legal way they choose. They are, ofcourse, only holidaymakers, and the rest of us would be no worse off if theywere forced to take their holidays in Bognor or Blackpool, although it would behard to argue that they were really better off than their parents if they hadto. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

This Airport Protest Flies in the Face of Logic; the Writing Is on the Wall: Camp for Climate Action Protesters Take Part in 24 Hours of "Direct Action" against Heathrow Operator BAA
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.