Catechism Is Reinvigorating Catholic Schools, Author Says

By Gibeau, Dawn | National Catholic Reporter, March 31, 1995 | Go to article overview

Catechism Is Reinvigorating Catholic Schools, Author Says


Gibeau, Dawn, National Catholic Reporter


The new universal catechism is inspiring creators of religious education curricula to tell the "whole story" of Catholicism rather than remain mired in their favorite parts, according to a top curriculum writer.

Thomas H. Groome, principal author of the "Coming to Faith" series, the most widely used curriculum in the United States, gave the Catechism of the Catholic Church an endorsement during a recent telephone interview. Groome's series is published by William H. Sadlier for kindergarten through grade eight.

Groome, senior professor of theology and religious education at Boston College, listed three developments in Catholic religious education he said are making headlines in the field:

* Catholic schools are experiencing "a new vibrancy, a new spirit of elan and revival" expressed in the reopening of some Catholic schools. Groome said his home diocese, Norwich, Conn., reopened three or four elementary schools this year.

* Recent research found that good parish catechetical programs successfully inculcate faith, a contrast with all previous research that said only religious education in Catholic schools was successful, The Educational Testing Service's findings are contained in its May 1994 report, "Toward Shaping the Agenda: A Study of Catholic Religious Education/Catechesis (NCR, July 15, 1994)."

* "The Catholic school religion curriculum is probably one of the most sophisticated in the world," better than ever before and better than in other nations and other subject areas, Groome said. Religion texts "have the best contemporary theology" and are "pedagogically very sophisticated, much better than most other social science" or other subject curricula.

He mentioned not only the Sadlier series but also curricula published by Benziger and Silver Burdett.

Groome said the Sadlier series was recently revised to reflect the church's new catechism. As curriculum creators endeavor to make sure their curricula tell the church's whole story, they "haven't lost the spirit of renewal of Vatican II," he said.

Giving an example, he explained that during the past 15 or 20 years, the theology of Eucharist in grade school curricula focused on Eucharist as community. That was an excellent, beautiful theology, he said, but many children who went to their local parish did not see a community meal. "We were speaking metaphorically," he said, and in so doing, left out the Mass.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Catechism Is Reinvigorating Catholic Schools, Author Says
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.