Draft Declaration on Indigenous Peoples Approved

UN Chronicle, December 1994 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Draft Declaration on Indigenous Peoples Approved


The Subcommission on Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities has approved, after 10 years of arduous negotiations, a draft declaration proclaiming the rights and unique value of indigenous peoples.

Faced with an ever-lengthening list of minority-related concerns, spawned by growing ethnic strife, large population movements, and other humanitarian catastrophes in the world, the Subcommission adopted 50 resolutions and 19 decisions at its forty-sixth session (1-26 August, Geneva). Issues ranged from crises in Rwanda and the Middle East, the transition to democracy in South Africa, to the rights of women, children and UN staff, and the violation of human rights and fundamental freedoms throughout the world.

Chairman Judith Sefi Attah of Nigeria said that people around the globe were becoming aware of their rights and were accordingly drawing the attention of Governments to rights that were being denied.

A total of eight texts on the rights of indigenous people were approved, as a prelude to the launching on 10 December of the International Decade of the World's Indigenous People. The 26-member Subcommission--the main subsidiary body of the Commission on Human Rights--welcomed the General Assembly's decision that the Decade's goal should be to strengthen international cooperation for the solution of problems faced by indigenous people in areas related to the environment, development, education and health. it recommended that the Decade's theme be: "Indigenous peoples: A new relationship; partnership in action".

The Subcommission also called for the International Day of Indigenous People to be observed every year on 9 August. The Secretary-General was asked to invite Governments and indigenous organizations to express their views concerning a permanent forum in the UN for indigenous people and recommended that the Centre for Human Rights organize a workshop on the matter.

The Subcommission also acted on the human rights situations in Albania, Iraq, Iran, Chad, Burundi, Togo, Guatemala, Haiti and Papua New Guinea.

One text called upon Governments to prevent, combat and eliminate terrorism and cooperate in the fight against it. Respect for the rights of UN staff members and their families was urged in another text.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Draft Declaration on Indigenous Peoples Approved
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.