From the Editor Gay Bryant

Success, July-August 2007 | Go to article overview

From the Editor Gay Bryant


WELCOME TO SUCCESS, THE SMALL-BUSINESS magazine where there's plenty of good news to share. First there's the takeaway from our virtual roundtable on The New Business Landscape--the good news that thanks to the transformative powers of technology and the Internet, opportunity has never been within the grasp of so many entrepreneurs as it is today.

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Commenting on our symposium, Chad Moutray, chief economist of the SBA, told us the small business economy isn't just good, but small businesses--that's you--provide 60 to 80% of new jobs annually.

Which means more business people have the freedom to pay some of their success forward. Since giving back is one of the greatest rewards of success, this issue features not only groups that are doing good like Peyton Manning's PeyBack foundation helping efforts to rebuild New Orleans and the Boaz and Ruth organization helping ex-offenders rebuild their futures, (P.50), but we also explain how giving back can make good business sense for you (P.48).

All this business success has to come from somewhere--and many of the greatest success stories of the day have arrived via the Internet. …

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From the Editor Gay Bryant
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