Sponsored CME Do Drug Companies Influence the Content? Continuing Medical Education (CME) Has Grown into a Thriving Educational 'Business' Whose Success Is Highly Dependent on Educational Grants

By Nasrallah, Henry A. | Current Psychiatry, August 2007 | Go to article overview

Sponsored CME Do Drug Companies Influence the Content? Continuing Medical Education (CME) Has Grown into a Thriving Educational 'Business' Whose Success Is Highly Dependent on Educational Grants


Nasrallah, Henry A., Current Psychiatry


The notion of a "quid pro quo" has grown among observers because the pharmaceutical industry provides most funding for CME programs in psychiatry and other specialties. Evaluations completed at that end of CME programs sometimes reflect attendees' perception that the content has been "slanted" in favor of the sponsor's proprietary drug(s).

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Congress weighs in. The issue of potential influence by pharmaceutical industry sponsors on the content of CME programs is heating up. Congress has decided to hold hearings to investigate allegations that drug companies may be using CME programs to skew doctors' treatment decisions or to circumvent laws against promoting off-label uses of medications. Congress wants to investigate whether a conflict of interest exists when pharmaceutical companies sponsor CME programs, especially when the speakers have received research grants, speaking honoraria, or consulting fees from the pharmaceutical sponsors.

Realities of CME. CME is required for the license renewal of physicians and nurses in all states. It is rigorously regulated by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), whose parent is the American Medical Association. Several thousand CME providers (including all medical schools) solicit educational grants from sponsors and offer programs in the form of grand rounds at teaching institutions, symposia, or dinner programs, etc.

Most teaching institutions have practically no internal funds to cover CME program costs, such as administrative expenses, speakers' travel and honoraria, refreshments and meals, venue charges, printing, parking, etc. Without grants from external sponsors, CME programs would shrink drastically, and the cost of CME credits for licensure renewal would skyrocket.

'Hands-off' policies. Over the past 3 years, the ACCME has tightened procedures for CME content development, and drug companies are complying with these "hands-off" requirements. All have adopted a similar process whereby a grants committee reviews applications and makes decisions devoid of marketing influences. As an applicant for CME grants, I find the process to have become more elaborate and the rate of funding lower than in the past. …

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Sponsored CME Do Drug Companies Influence the Content? Continuing Medical Education (CME) Has Grown into a Thriving Educational 'Business' Whose Success Is Highly Dependent on Educational Grants
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