Long-Time Volunteer Served on National and Diocesan Councils

Anglican Journal, June-July 2007 | Go to article overview

Long-Time Volunteer Served on National and Diocesan Councils


Betty Livingston

Betty Livingston, who served the Anglican Church of Canada at the local, diocesan, provincial, and national levels, died June 6 in London, Ont.

Ms. Livingston became ill at a dinner following a meeting of delegates scheduled to attend the General Synod meeting in Winnipeg in June. She later died in hospital in London, Ont. She was to receive the Anglican Award of Merit, the church's highest award for lay people, in the fall.

An active parishioner at All Saints', Windsor, Ont., Ms. Livingston was a former prolocutor for the synod of the ecclesiastical (church) province of Ontario, a member of the national financial management and development committee, and a delegate of the provincial synod and General Synod. She was also a member of Huron's diocesan council, and several committees, including administration and finance, human resources and pension trustees. In 2004, Ms. Livingston received the Order of Huron, in recognition of all her work for the diocese and the community of Windsor.

Ms. Livingston is survived by four children and grandchildren.

John McMulkin

Archdeacon John McMulkin, former dean of Saskatchewan and director of the Anglican "Foundation, died May 8 in Georgetown, Ont., of heart failure. He was 81.

During his tenure at the foundation, from 1979 to 1990, "he was instrumental in promoting planned giving and the good that you can do for the church after your death. People came to him and asked about it and planned giving started to really grow after that," said June Moyle, executive assistant of the foundation, who worked with Mr. McMulkin over the course of his term.

"He was very caring, very much of a teacher and extremely patient. He was well-loved," she recalled. In an e-mail to staff at the national office of the Anglican Church of Canada in Toronto, communications director Vianney (Sam) Carriere fondly remembered Mr. …

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Long-Time Volunteer Served on National and Diocesan Councils
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