ANALYSIS: How the Buddha Still Speaks to a Modern City; Today, in Our Series Investigating 'What Makes a Good City?', We Look at the Buddhist and Muslim Perspectives. Buddhism Expert Dr Elizabeth Harris Argues Diversity Is Essential, While DrJabal Buaben, a Lecturer on Islam at Birmingham University, States It Depends on a Morally Principled Society Buddhist Perspective

The Birmingham Post (England), September 5, 2007 | Go to article overview

ANALYSIS: How the Buddha Still Speaks to a Modern City; Today, in Our Series Investigating 'What Makes a Good City?', We Look at the Buddhist and Muslim Perspectives. Buddhism Expert Dr Elizabeth Harris Argues Diversity Is Essential, While DrJabal Buaben, a Lecturer on Islam at Birmingham University, States It Depends on a Morally Principled Society Buddhist Perspective


Byline: By Dr Elizabeth Harris

A city is a place of radical plurality - plurality of religion, belief, ethnicity, culture, economic status, political affiliation, sexuality and ability. How to manage this plurality is a major challenge for any city authority. For plurality can be explosive if awareness of difference is triggered by international events, perceived discrimination or resentment about unequal distribution of resources. Different words and phrases have been coined to describe the task of making a city harmonious: integration; cohesion; regeneration; renewal; capacity-building; gaining stakeholder confidence; co-responsibility; co-existence.

What can the insights of Buddhism offer to this? Buddhism as we know it today began in the 5th century BCE with a 29 year old, Sid-dhartha Gautama, leaving an aristocratic home in north-east India to become an itinerant religious searcher and then preacher. According to Buddhist practitioners, he became a Buddha - one who had awoken to the truth that upholds the cosmos - after six years of exploration. He taught this truth for about 40 years, forming around him a fourfold community of lay men, lay women, monks and nuns.

He died at an advanced age surrounded by loving disciples, having created a movement that was to spread throughout northern India, Central Asia and far beyond. Can what he taught speak to a modern city? Buddhists would say it can for two main reasons: the context of India in the 5th century BCE was not completely unlike the 21st century; the teaching of the Buddha transcends the particular and can speak to the human condition throughout time.

Buddhism was successful in India because it offered something for the whole of society. Not only did the Buddha call upon people to leave their families to follow him as celibate members of an Order, he also advised rulers and inspired many who remained deeply involved in family life. He did this against a backdrop of growing urbanization, economic change and a plethora of competing beliefs and ideologies.

Those who left their homes to follow him had to compete for lay patronage in a market-place of religious practices and political affiliations. It is also clear from the earliest Buddhist texts, the Therava da Buddhist Canon, that there was violence in the Buddha's India.

One stereotype of Buddhism is that it is about individual well-being and peace only. …

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ANALYSIS: How the Buddha Still Speaks to a Modern City; Today, in Our Series Investigating 'What Makes a Good City?', We Look at the Buddhist and Muslim Perspectives. Buddhism Expert Dr Elizabeth Harris Argues Diversity Is Essential, While DrJabal Buaben, a Lecturer on Islam at Birmingham University, States It Depends on a Morally Principled Society Buddhist Perspective
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