TODAY'S LETTERS: Readers Still Heated over Climate Change Column and Katrina Anniversary

By , E&P | Editor & Publisher, August 31, 2007 | Go to article overview

TODAY'S LETTERS: Readers Still Heated over Climate Change Column and Katrina Anniversary


, E&P, Editor & Publisher


Readers aren't taking a break just yet over rebuffing Steve Outing's column about Climate Change, while others responded to the Hurricane Katrina anniversary.

***

Re: Coverage of Bush and Graham Greene

It is ironic that veteran groups should be inviting and listening to draft dodging, combat avoiders such as W. Bush and Cheney's gung-ho rhetoric. I quit both.

Steve BlockWW2 USN

Global Warning and 'Chilling'

The title of Steve Outing's web column, "Climate Change: Get Over Objectivity, Newspapers," sent a chilling jolt through me.

Getting over objectivity is a questionable recommendation for newspapers or any other news medium, particulary in this era of web "journalists" and web sites whose "objectivity" and adherence to verified sources and genuine facts is often dubious.

While Outing directed his concept toward a "do-good" crusade, where would "get over objectivity" end? Foreign policy? Space projects? War? If newspaper journalists do not stand as guardians of objectivity, who will? Good, objective reporting has always sent an understandable message to readers.

Editorials and commentary, appropriately labeled as such, allow plenty of flexibility in approaching a subject, but shouldn't "objectivity" remain an untrampled bulwark for good journalists, as I thought it always had in my 50 years associated with both print and broadcast news.

Bob KimmelChairman, Editorial BoardThe Hudson IndependentTarrytown, N.Y.

Your missive about newspapers pushing the Global Warming issue is interesting. Who would have thought that someone in the MSM would advocate pushing an agenda to the public whether the public wants it or not.

Global Warming is real, Human caused Global Warming is bunk. It has not been proved nor is there a consensus except by those who wish to make the US a third world country.

As somebody who has been in the industry for 25 years I find your agenda part of the problem with the Dinosaur Media. Our media outlets do not respect their customers, they do everything they can to insult them and do not care to make changes when said customers complain or revolt by leaving.

The newspaper is not there to push an agenda, it is there to repot the news and let the customer decide for themselves. Until we get back to that ideal, we are on the Dinosaur Media Death Watch. Karl WeinbergPort Orange, Fla.

Steve Outing's column on climate change was one of the most misguided columns on the subject I've ever read ... and I've read a lot of misguided stuff on this subject over the years. Outing wrote, "The few critics of the consensus are a small and shrinking group, who to most observers seem irrelevant. To the mainstream, they may as well be flat-earthers." Outing is deeply confused about the subject. Two recent surveys of scientists - one of 530 climate scientists conducted in 2003 by German scientists Dennis Bray and Hans von Storch and the second conducted in 2006 of members of the National Registry of Environmental Professionals - shed some light on what scientists really believe. Most scientists (more than 80 percent) believe some global warming has occurred. The best estimate is that global temperatures have risen about 1 degree Fahrenheit during the past 100 years. A majority of scientists, but certainly not all, believe the human presence is responsible for some part of the recent warming. Most scientists believe it is not yet possible to determine how much of the modern warming is the result of natural cycles and how much is due to human activities. The scientific community is split down the middle on whether future warming would be moderate and benign, or severe and harmful. Most scientists don't believe we can predict what future climates will look like. And there is no agreement at all on what, if anything, we should about global warming. So where did Outing get the idea that there's a "consensus" that the modern warming is man-made and will be catastrophic? …

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