Two Awards Programs Seeking Nominations

Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, August 2007 | Go to article overview

Two Awards Programs Seeking Nominations


AFB recently issued a call for nomiations for two of its awards programs. The Migel Medals, the highest honors bestowed by AFB, were established in 1937 by the late M. C. Migel, AFB's first chairperson, to honor professionals and volunteers whose dedication and achievements have significantly improved the lives of people who are blind or visually impaired. Every year, the Migel Medals are awarded in two categories: the Professional Award and the Lay Volunteer Award. Professional Award nominees should be those whose work has had a significant impact on services to people who are blind or visually impaired throughout the United States. Prospective candidates include, but are not limited to, professionals with specific training and expertise in education, rehabilitation, assistive technology, vision rehabilitation, personnel preparation, administration, or related fields. They may work in the public or private sector, and their work should span several years. Past recipients include Berdell (Pete) Wurzburger, who, at San Francisco State University, established and ran a training program in orientation and mobility (O&M) for more than 20 years, training hundreds of teachers and O&M specialists; Rachel Rosenbaum, president of the Carroll Center for the Blind and co-founder of the National Association of Private Agencies for the Blind; and Louis Vieceli, emeritus professor of the Rehabilitation Institute of Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, who established and taught job placement techniques for over 30 years, training hundreds of rehabilitation practitioners. Lay Volunteer Award nominees may be volunteers or employees within the field of visual impairment and blindness whose efforts have supported or extended services for people with vision loss. Professionals from other disciplines may include, but are not limited to, those who develop assistive technology equipment and software, health care devices, and improved medical services. …

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Two Awards Programs Seeking Nominations
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