Global Research Initiative Program, Behavioral/social Sciences (R01)

Environmental Health Perspectives, May 2007 | Go to article overview

Global Research Initiative Program, Behavioral/social Sciences (R01)


This program is intended to promote productive development of foreign investigators from low- to middle-income countries, trained in the United States or in their home countries through specific Fogarty International Center D43 or U2R training programs, to independent researcher in their home countries or other low- or middle-income countries. This program will dovetail with several specific research training mechanisms, including training in the NIH Intramural Visiting Fellows Program, the Fogarty International Center research training programs (D43 or U2R), the NIDA INVEST, or Humphrey Fellowships, NIEHS junior scientist programs, and the Human Frontier Science Program, as part of a broader program to enhance the scientific research infrastructure in low- to middle-income countries, to stimulate research on a wide variety of high-priority health-related issues of importance in those countries, and to advance NIH efforts to address health issues of global import.

The specific goal of this initiative is to provide funding opportunities for the increasing pool of foreign social and behavioral scientists, clinical investigators, nurses, and other health professionals, on their return to their home countries, with state-of-the-art knowledge of research methods to advance the critical issues in global health through social and behavioral sciences research.

After their term of research training, low- to middle-income country participants supported by this announcement are expected to continue independent and productive scientific careers, including providing expert training and consultation to others, and/or research on behavioral and/or social science issues within their home institutions.

This announcement contributes to the FIC mission and the broad NIH initiative to reduce health disparities among nations by strengthening research infrastructure in low- to middle-income countries, particularly those with the least economic resources. It also provides the opportunity for recently trained international health and health care researchers to continue their projects after returning home.

Definitions of "behavioral" and "social": For the purposes of this initiative, the term "behavioral" refers to overt actions; to underlying psychological processes such as cognitions, emotion, temperament, and motivation; and to biobehavioral interactions. The term "social" encompasses sociocultural, socioeconomic, and sociodemographic status; to biosocial interactions; and to the various levels of social context from small groups to complex cultural systems and societal influences.

The core areas of behavioral and social sciences research are those that have a major and explicit focus on the understanding of behavior and social processes, or on the use of these processes to predict or influence health outcomes or health risk factors. These core areas of research are divided into basic (or fundamental) research and clinical research.

As part of its global health initiative under the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), the Fogarty International Center (FIC), in partnership with the National Eye Institute (NEI); the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA); the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS); all of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR), the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS), and the Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH), all of the Office of the Director (OD) of the NIH, invites applications from current and former NIH-supported foreign research trainees to compete for funds that will support their research efforts upon return to their home countries. To be eligible, foreign scientists must meet at least one of the following criteria: 1) at least 2 years of research training experience under an FIC-supported training grant (classified by the D43 and U2R mechanisms); 2) 1 year of such D43 or U2R training experience coupled with 1 year of significant, well-documented, mentored research experience (e. …

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Global Research Initiative Program, Behavioral/social Sciences (R01)
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