30 Years after His Death, We Are Still a Long Way from Biko's Vision of Liberation

Cape Times (South Africa), September 11, 2007 | Go to article overview

30 Years after His Death, We Are Still a Long Way from Biko's Vision of Liberation


Mosibudi Mangena

Tomorrow, September 12, marks the 30th anniversary of the death of Steve Bantu Biko in detention in 1977.

When we commemorate his death, there is a strong need to consider his contribution to the struggle for emancipation.

Biko was a leading pillar of the Black Consciousness ideology, which exhorts blacks to liberate themselves from physical and psychological oppression which results from living for centuries in oppressive society.

Black Consciousness galvanised black people, particularly young people, in the '70s and '80s to fight against oppression, resulting in the crumbling of the white racist regime.

However, it seems as if the inferiority complexes induced in us by centuries of negative propaganda against our personality and natural attributes remain stubbornly in us. After colonial conquest, generation after generation of black people were told that we are an inferior version of the human species, our features very ugly, our intelligence suspect, our culture backward and our languages inferior.

So many of us have internalised these negative perceptions of ourselves. This was evident during many years of white racist rule and it is still a feature of our lives under this new democracy. Instead of using the political power we now wield to liberate ourselves mentally, we now use our freedom to run as far away from ourselves as possible.

In fact, many things are under greater pressure in the democratic order than before. We shun the use of African languages for education, broadcasting and discourse. Black parents resist the use of African languages as a medium of instruction, even if this blunts the cognitive abilities of their own children.

They are happier to have their children speaking English better than their own languages.

Departments of African languages at our universities are on the brink of collapse. There are hardly any newspapers in African languages and the little there is on television does not reflect the fact that that the medium belongs to the majority and is supposed to reflect the majority. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

30 Years after His Death, We Are Still a Long Way from Biko's Vision of Liberation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.