Administration Pushes for Passage of Free Trade Agreements

By Wollack, Leslie | Nation's Cities Weekly, September 3, 2007 | Go to article overview

Administration Pushes for Passage of Free Trade Agreements


Wollack, Leslie, Nation's Cities Weekly


The White House is pushing Congress to ratify four trade agreements when it returns from the summer recess that include unprecedented language on labor practices forced by the Democratic majority. The pending agreements are with Peru, Columbia, Panama and Korea.

The trade pacts the Administration has reached with Peru and Panama would require those two countries and the United States to uphold basic rights as outlined by the International Labor Organization (ILO), a U.N.-sponsored agency that has monitored working conditions worldwide for almost a century. President Bush's authority to negotiate trade agreements that aren't subject to congressional amendment expired at the end of June, but the Peruvian and Panamanian accords were signed in time. These pacts do require approval by Congress before they can take effect.

The Latin American agreements would provide duty-free access to approximately 75 million consumers, a market which has risen by 90 percent between the years 2001 and 2006. According to the United States Trade Representative's Office, more than 19,500 companies export products to Peru, Columbia and Panama, and in 2006, United States goods exports totaled $2.9 billion to Peru, $6.7 billion to Columbia, and $2.7 billion to Panama.

The agreements eliminate tariffs on United States exports to those countries and provide new market opportunities for farmers and ranchers. The agreements would expand market access for United States service suppliers with new protections against discriminatory or arbitrary measures against United States companies.

International labor experts say referring specifically to ILO language, which has been interpreted in many official settings over time, will set a clear benchmark for acceptable and unacceptable labor practices. That's different from some earlier agreements, which just included a general list of ideals that weren't tied to any precedent. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Administration Pushes for Passage of Free Trade Agreements
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.