BAA's Daredevil Boss Dives into a Fierce Dogfight; Terminal Boredom: Passengers Fall Asleep after Many Hours of Enforced Delays at Stansted Nerves of Steel: Stephen Nelson, Left, Pictured with BA Boss Willie Walsh, Did a Bungee Jump at Bloukrans Bridge, Above

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), September 23, 2007 | Go to article overview

BAA's Daredevil Boss Dives into a Fierce Dogfight; Terminal Boredom: Passengers Fall Asleep after Many Hours of Enforced Delays at Stansted Nerves of Steel: Stephen Nelson, Left, Pictured with BA Boss Willie Walsh, Did a Bungee Jump at Bloukrans Bridge, Above


Byline: TOM MCGHIE

He has taken part in the world's highest bungeejump-a708ftplungeat Bloukrans Bridge in South Africa. He has cycled 508 miles non-stop on aroute crossing Death Valley in America. But now Stephen Nelson, whose companyruns Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted airports, is taking the biggest risk ofall.

He has thrown out the management maxim dictating that the customer is alwaysright and decided to turn the tables in the blame game on to his biggestclients - the airlines.

After months of fevered criticism for levels of service that have according todetractors transformed Heathrow, the UK's premier gateway, into a nationaldisgrace, BAA - owned by Spain's Ferrovial - has decided to take on itstormentors.

Chief executive Nelson and his senior team at the beleaguered company are sofed up with carrying the can for all the ills at their airports - ranging fromdirty loos, mucky carpets and broken escalators to baggage delays, hugecheck-in queues and lost luggage - that they have decided to take aim at theiraccusers, the airlines.

Financial Mail understands that Nelson is now considering publicising a nameand shame league table in an attempt to deflect the criticism. This willclearly identify the cause of the delays, whether at check-in, immigration orsecurity.

BAA is confident that the airlines, which are responsible for baggage handlingand check-in facilities, and the Home Office, which staffs the immigrationdesks, will be shown up as the real villains.

BAA is expected to consult airports regulator the Civil Aviation Authority andthe Government about how the league table will be compiled and it is sensitiveto the fact that a name and shame policy could become the source of yet moreconflict.

Its main target inevitably will be British Airways, which dominates Heathrowand which has incensed BAA by calling for it to be broken up. Airlines arguethat if Gatwick is sold, its management will compete with Heathrow and thatwill mean lower charges. At present it costs about [pounds sterling]10 per passenger to land aplane at Heathrow and only [pounds sterling]5 at Gatwick.

British Airways is privately furious that BAA should be seen to be trying topoint the finger at its main customer.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

BAA's Daredevil Boss Dives into a Fierce Dogfight; Terminal Boredom: Passengers Fall Asleep after Many Hours of Enforced Delays at Stansted Nerves of Steel: Stephen Nelson, Left, Pictured with BA Boss Willie Walsh, Did a Bungee Jump at Bloukrans Bridge, Above
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.