Public Split on Muslims, Mormons; Polls Reveals Negative Views

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 26, 2007 | Go to article overview

Public Split on Muslims, Mormons; Polls Reveals Negative Views


Byline: Kristi Moore, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Americans' attitudes about Muslims are more negative now than in years past, while a slim majority of the public expresses a favorable view of Mormons, according to a national religious poll released yesterday.

"I think the main find in this survey is the fact that the public holds such mixed views of Islam and Mormonism," said Gregory Smith, research fellow for the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life.

The survey indicated that about 43 percent of Americans say they have a favorable opinion of Muslims, while 35 percent express a negative view. Opinions of Muslims were more positive in 2004, with 48 percent favorable and 32 percent unfavorable.

As in previous surveys, Muslim Americans are seen more positively than Muslims overall; however, opinions of Muslim Americans have also become more negative.

A mere 53 percent of the public expresses "a favorable view of Mormons, while 27 percent view Mormons unfavorably," stated the survey released by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life.

For religious groups, the survey indicated that "a solid majority of white mainline Protestants and white non-Hispanic Catholics express favorable opinions of Mormons," said the survey conducted for Pew by Schulman, Ronca & Bucuvalas Inc. "Among white evangelical Protestants, just 46 percent have a positive impression of Mormons, while 39 percent have an unfavorable opinion."

Mr. Smith was also intrigued by the fact that about 31 percent of Americans say that Mormonism is not a Christian religion.

Opinions were also affected by personal experiences, the poll indicating that among those who know a Muslim, for instance, 56 percent have a favorable overall impression of Muslims, compared with just 32 percent of those who are not acquainted with a Muslim.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Public Split on Muslims, Mormons; Polls Reveals Negative Views
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.