Badminton Game Drills

By Howard, Robert Kenneth | JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, April 1995 | Go to article overview

Badminton Game Drills


Howard, Robert Kenneth, JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance


Game drills are excellent teaching tools for effective use of class time.

Badminton, just as other racquet sports, requires proficiency in a variety of skills. To be competitive, students should spend time practicing these skills. Unfortunately, teachers may have students spend too much time playing and not enough time practicing the essential shots needed to perfect the game. Because practice time is shortened, students lose the opportunity to develop their strokes.

On the other hand, some teachers may spend too much time on practice. As a result, students may lose focus if drills become monotonous repetition, and their effort and enthusiasm may be drained.

In either scenario, the important game elements - focus, concentration, and accuracy - are not being properly reinforced. Although both approaches to teaching badminton have merit, only dedicated and motivated students will appreciate the lessons and practice effectively. Most students need practice time that is motivating and challenging. Game drills can provide that challenge because they focus on selected skills and tactics while placing students in competitive situations that closely simulate game conditions.

Game drills are excellent teaching tools for effective use of class time and help the students achieve the following:

* skill proficiency

* awareness of court tactics and proper shot selections

* increased intensity of concentration and focus

* motivation to practice specific shots

* physical conditioning

Badminton Game Drills:

"21"

Objective: To create pressure on the serve and increase concentration on executing shots for winner.

Procedure: All rules governing the game of singles or doubles except the rules governing scoring.

Scoring: 21 points win the game and points are awarded as follows:

* 1 point to the serving player or team for all errors committed by the receiving player or team.

* 2 points by the receiving player or team when a server commits a fault serve.

* 3 points by player or team for clear winners (when the shuttlecock hits the floor, within the boundary lines without being touched by the receiving player or team).

"4 Corners"

Objective: To encourage players to direct drops and clears to the 4 corners of the opponent's court.

Court setup: Use floor tape to form a 4-foot by 4-foot square at all 4 corners on each court.

Procedure: Play the game according to official rules for badminton. However, 2 points are awarded to the serving or receiving team when the shuttle lands in any of the four corners on a given side.

Scoring: The first player or team to score the designated points to end an official game.

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