Northern Ireland: EMERALD ISLE WILL MAKE YOU SMILE; Gayle Ritchie Has a Craic-Ing Time in Vibrant Cities and Lush Countryside of Northern Ireland

Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland), September 30, 2007 | Go to article overview

Northern Ireland: EMERALD ISLE WILL MAKE YOU SMILE; Gayle Ritchie Has a Craic-Ing Time in Vibrant Cities and Lush Countryside of Northern Ireland


If you fancy a refreshing break in one of Europe's safest, friendliest and most exuberant tourist hotspots, look no further than Northern Ireland.

Whether you want vibrant cities or glorious countryside, you'll have a ball.

A great deal has happened here politically and economically in the past few years and old perceptions of the 'troubled' north have been rewritten.

Belfast's dynamic nightlife - with its thriving club scene, swanky bars, traditional pubs and gourmet restaurants - has huge appeal.

Its setting is as dramatic as its history and its fascinating story is evident everywhere.

Proof of the city port's renewal is the huge increase in hotel numbers - they have trebled in just five years.

But it's easy to escape the beaten track and find yourself surrounded by lush green countryside.

Miles of cycle tracks and way-marked walks have opened up enchanting rural and coastal areas and getting around by bike or on foot are fantastic ways to explore the real beauty of the country.

After just three days roaming about, my stress had melted away.

I took the Stena Line ferry crossing from Stranraer to Belfast, a speedy and relaxing journey.

First stop was the four-star Radisson SAS Hotel, a great base for exploring as it is in a quiet location just 10 minutes' walk from the city centre. I loved the welcoming bar, friendly staff and great fitness suite.

After enjoying a hearty feast at the stylish Oxford Exchange restaurant, I strolled round the compact downtown and found it impossible not to stop at several pubs. The highlight was McHugh's Bar, with a fantastic old-time frontage.

It's one of the few bars that makes any reference to the troubled past. On the walls are framed front pages of the Belfast Telegraph bearing the headlines "It's over" and "Peace at last" to mark the ceasefires.

The next day it was time for lunch at the city's bestknown pub, The Crown.

Famed for its buzzing atmosphere, original gas lamps, cosy snugs, ornate mirrors and stained glass windows, the food was delicious.

Once I'd stuffed myself with a bowl of stew and champ and several pints of Guinness, it was time for a bus trip through the Sperrins landscape, a rich tapestry of pasture, woods and hills.

On my arrival at the An Creagan Visitor Centre, I began a 15-mile cycle along solitary backroads stretching from moor to mountain.

The centre also boasts fascinating archaeological sites, interpretative displays, trails and walks.

Next stop was the historic walled city of Derry, also known as Londonderry. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Northern Ireland: EMERALD ISLE WILL MAKE YOU SMILE; Gayle Ritchie Has a Craic-Ing Time in Vibrant Cities and Lush Countryside of Northern Ireland
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.