Human Trafficking Continues Slave Trade, Says Ndungane

Cape Times (South Africa), October 4, 2007 | Go to article overview

Human Trafficking Continues Slave Trade, Says Ndungane


BYLINE: QUINTON MTYALA

HUMAN traffickers have created a new form of slavery, 200 years after the end of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

According to Jeffrey Avina, of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, traffickers were organised enough to scout for countries with the "weakest link", although not in the formal sense.

Avina was speaking at the UN-sponsored Global Initiative to Counter Human Trafficking conference in the Cape Town International Convention Centre yesterday, where religious leaders in the southern African region were urged to help counter "modern-day slavery".

Anglican Archbishop Njongonkulu Ndungane said that, 200 years after Britain outlawed the slave trade, it still continued to this day with 800 000 people being trafficked around the world annually.

"We are rallying faith communities to get involved in fighting this scourge," said Ndungane.

He said 80% of those trafficked were woman and children, in most cases for sexual purposes.

Thoko Majokweni, of the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), said one of the ways to stop trafficking was through the involvement of civic groups.

"The religious community should send out messages that they can help people who are being trafficked," said Majokweni who works in the NPA's Sexual Offences and Community Affairs Unit. …

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