1975 the Year That Was

English Studies in Canada, December 2004 | Go to article overview

1975 the Year That Was


As English Studies in Canada celebrates so years of publishing history, we thought we'd investigate what else happened back in 1975. Here's a look.

World Population:

4,088,224,047

Canadian Incumbents:

QUEEN: Elizabeth n

PRIME MINISTER: Pierre Trudeau

GOVERNOR GENERAL: Jules Leger

PREMIER OF ALBERTA: Peter Lougheed

PREMIER OF BRITISH COLUMBIA: David Barrett, then W.R. Bennett

PREMIER OF MANITOBA: Edward Schreyer

PREMIER OF NEW BRUNSWICK: Richard Hatfield

PREMIER OF NEWFOUNDLAND: Frank Moores

PREMIER of NOVA SCOTIA: Gerald Regan

PREMIER OF ONTARIO: Bill Davis

PREMIER OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND: Alexander B. Campbell

PREMIER OF QUEBEC: Robert Bourassa

PREMIER OF SASKATCHEWAN: Allan Blakeney

U.S. Incumbents:

PRESIDENT: Gerald Ford, the only president never to have been elected to either the Presidency or the Vice Presidency.

VICE PRESIDENT: Nelson Rockefeller

SECRETARY OF STATE: Henry Kissinger

SECRETARY OF DEFENSE: James Schlesinger, then Donald Rumsfeld

Other Important 1975 Events:

Izay Asper acquires Winnipeg television station CKNO, the beginning of what would become a nations media empire.

Rohinton Mistry immigrates to Canada.

The cac broadcasts the Juno Awards live for the first time.

Home videotape systems (the "VCR") is developed in Japan by Sony (Betamax) and Matsushita (VHS).

The Altair 8800 is released in January, sparking the era of the microcomputer. It ships as a mail-order kit for $397 and contains t kilobyte (1K) of memory. Over 2,000 units will be sold by year's end. Bill Gates and Paul Allen license their version of the BASIC programming language to the parent company, MITS (see July 22, November 29).

January

1 International Women's Year begins.

1 Product labeling using the metric system is introduced in Canada.

1 Ingmar Bergman's Version of Mozart's The Magic Flute, entitled Trollflojten, premieres on Swedish television. It will premiere on us. television on 11 November.

5 The Wiz opens on Broadway.

5 The Tasman Bridge in Tasmania, Australia, is struck by the bulk carrier Lake Illawarra, killing twelve people.

6 Wheel Of Fortune, a television game show from the 1950s, redebuts on NBC-TV.

6 Led Zeppelin fans riot before Boston concert, causing $30,000 damage.

7 OPEC agrees to raise crude oil prices by Io%.

7 Bollingen Prize for poetry awarded to A. R. Ammons.

9 600 employees of the Royal Canadian Mint go on strike.

10 Japanese Soldier Teruo Nakamura surrenders on the Indonesian Island of Morota.

12 The Pittsburgh Steelers defeat the Minnesota Vikings 16-6 to win Super Bowl rx.

13 Petty Bay in the Northwest Territories experiences -51[degrees]C, but the windchill with 50-km winds makes it feel like -92[degrees]C.

14 17-year-old heiress Lesley Whittle is kidnapped from her home in Shropshire, England, by the Black Panther.

15 Space Mountain opens at Disneyland.

18 The Jeffersons, a spinoff series from All in the Family, premieres on CBS.

29 Martin Scorsese's Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore premieres in New York City (it premiered in Los Angeles on December 9, 1974).

31 Barry Manilow's "Mandy" goes gold.

February

4 Queen Elizabeth it visits Mexico.

4 The first successfully predicted earthquake occurs in Haicheng, Liaoning, China.

9 The Soyuz 17 Soviet spacecraft returns to Earth.

11 Margaret Thatcher defeats Edward Heath for the leadership of the Conservative Party in the United Kingdom.

18 Sylvia Ostry is appointed Canada's first female Deputy Minister.

21 John Mitchell, H.R. Haldeman and John D.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

1975 the Year That Was
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.