AGENDA: Creationism Should Be Kept out of the National Curriculum

The Birmingham Post (England), October 12, 2007 | Go to article overview

AGENDA: Creationism Should Be Kept out of the National Curriculum


Byline: ROSHAN DOUG

One of my favourite philosophers is the British-born Bertrand Russell who argued vehemently in his book Why I'm Not Christian that the idea of God is based on a monumental fallacy and delusion. The notion of a creator, he stated, flies against common sense and logic - not to mention the insurmountable mathematical laws that govern the universe. We therefore have the right to challenge people's concept of God. So in the true spirit of Russell here's a warning: this column may cause offence to religious fundamentalists - Christians, Jews and Muslims alike. But I make no apologies for this because I can't help feeling these children of Abraham - who have caused so much political turmoil and cultural friction in the world - deserve what they get.

But don't get me wrong, I am not in anyway going to advocate Russell's atheism or Richard Dawkins' intellectual sneering and academic scepticism - that doesn't appeal to me either.

However, I was rather astonished to hear that some religious people - mainly Christians, it has to be said - want creationism (yes, creationism and I refuse to grace it with a capital c) to be taught in schools. And not only taught but to be taught seriously the way we teach Science and Mathematics. Or Darwinism.

And upon what wonderfully enlightening texts are educationalists going to base their teaching? The Koran and the Bible? Oh please, as any sane person with an ounce of common sense will tell you, these ambiguous, inflammatory texts are built on nothing but elusive, meandering poetic-prose. They're hardly on a par with the rationale of the European Renaissance period let alone science of the 21st century.

In contrast, and rather coincidentally, we learn this week that a British palaeontologist has discovered what he thinks is the world's first tyrannosaurus rex footprint.

T rex was, as scientists will explain, one of the last dinosaurs to exist before they were wiped out in a mass extinction (and no, it wasn't the Flood). …

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